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"'■'•: , f Murnh) Building. San Francisco 

Lto" OUR" PATRONS- 



GENERAL PUBLIC 



J. J. O'BRIEN & CO. 

MURPHY BUILDINC 

Market and Jones Sts. 



m#* : ;« 




Our Grand Annual Clearance Sale. 

In accordance with our established custom, we inaugurate 
the New Year with a grand annual clearance sale of the 
balance of our great Winter Stock of Dry Good3, preparatory 
to the receipt of Spring Goods, and in announcing this sale 
we wish to most cordially thank our many customers 
throughout the Pacific Coast for the immense volume of 
patronage accorded us during the year just closed, and 
assure them that it will ever he our aim to maintain the 
high position we have attained in their esteem by reason of 
our unremitting efforts in their behalf. 

It has not been our custom to issua a catalogue for our 
annual clearance sales, as our regular patrons look forward 
to them as seasons of extraordinary bargains, and a mere 
newspaper announcement is always sufficient to induce an 
immediate and liberal response from the thousands who in 
previous years have profited by irresistible inducements 
offered, but this list of sample quotations is prepared for the 
special purpose of giving the many new customers who have 
favored us with their trade during the past year an idea of 
the stupendous reductions from regular prices at which goods 
are disposed of during these sales, thus enabling all to share 
equally in the wonderful opportunity presented. 

Wc wish it thoroughly understood that this sale is not an 
offering of odds and ends, but that our offerings consist of 
elegant assortments of seasonable and fashionable goods, 
comprising the remainder of our great Winter Stock, which 
is universally conceded to have been the most extensive, 
diversified and complete collection of fine Dry Goods ever 
displayed in this market. 

Nothing has been spared from this sweeping cut in prices, 
as we must close out everything before the arrival of Spring 
importations, every inch of the miles of shelving in our 
Mammoth Establishment being required for the accommo- 
dation of the immense purchases made by our buyers located 
in Eastern and European manufacturing centers. 

The enormous and constantly increasing mail-order busi- 
ness done by us is proof that 




Oar Great Country Order Department 

tem of 

hand n carefully studied as to the 

iua living at a distance from tho 

therefore all who are Doable to make their selections in 

n every detail of their written orders being 

promptly and satisfactorily executed. 

well-known liberality in exchanging goods is sufficient 
have the interests of our patrons ever 

■ us, and that nothing we can do in their behalf will 
tected. 

iving any immediate or prospective need of any- 

line cannot afford to miss this sale, 

and as a speedy clearance is assured by the startling reductions 

. should n«»t delay sending their orders, as tho best 

obtained by an early selection. 

Intending purchasers not finding exactly what they want 

■ !, are invited to write us for samples and priess, as 
our ;i though reduced in quantity, aro still 

natively unbroken, and we feel confident of our ability 
to meet the requirements of all with choice goods at tho 
greatest reductions ever named in this market. 

All country customers who have access to the columns of 
the daily papers of this city should bear in mind that they 
can have the benefit of our daily special offerings if their 
orders reach us before such goods arc sold. 

Orders for goods by mail should be accompanied by stamps 
or money to pay postage, otherwise the goods will be sent by 
express. 

Ladies receiving more than one copy of this catalogue will 
confer a favor by handing ib to a friend or neighbor whom 
they think will be interested in its contents. 

It should be borne in mind that all benefits given city cus- 
tomers are equally offered those who favor us with mail 
orders, all we require to make a satisfactory return "to an 
order being a brief but perfect description of what is wanted, 
or permission to use our own judgment. Respectfully, 

Telephone No. 3240. J. J- O'BRIEN & CO. 



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£ «a 

£■ 4^-Possessiug exclusive privileges of perfect light and ventilation. •} 

£» our patrons can thoroughly examine our stock, with the greatest «S 

v* personal comfort. «j 

£. «S"Ordersby Mail or Telephone promptly filled, and forwarded »S 

fr by return Mail or Messenger. "Sj 

£» Ay-Somplessentfree on receipt of request, to any address ^ 

^ ^ 

£• Ac*our Mail Order Department is perfect, and saves patrons their «3,' 

v* railroad fares. «y 

£j .*» a, I , tiichases delivered free of carriage charges in Oakland, Ala- ^ 

? meda, and Berkeley. ^ 

8» AS'-When yon come to lown, call on us. No trouble to show ^ 

v* goods, and no importuning; to purchase permitted, ^ 



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ALPHABETICAL LIST OF SOME HISTORI- ' 

CAi EVENTS, HANDY FACTS AND 

NO TABLE DISCO VERIES 

Alexandrian Library, The; contained 400,01)0 valuable books ! 
47 r. c. 

Almighty Dollar. The term originated with Washington 
Irving as a satire on the American love fop gain. 

American Flag. First used at Cambridge by Washington 
in 1776; legally established by Congress June 14, 1777. 
Assassination of Lincoln, April 14, 1865. 
Astoria, Oregon, is called the Venice of America. 
Autheutic History of China commenced 3,000 years r. c. 
Battles of Bunker Hill and Lexington, 177.".. 
Benjamin Franklin used the first lightning rods, 1762. 
Boston is called the Athens of America. 
"Boz" was the nom deplume of Charity Dickens. 
"Bravest of the Brave," the title given Mara 
Kriedland, 1807. 

Brick, burnt, were known to have been used in the Tower of 
Babel. They were introduced into England by the Romans. 
Bureau of Education was established 1867. 
Catacombs, most ancient, are those of the Thebau kings, 
begun 4,000 years ago. 

Catacombs of Rome contain the remains of about 6,000,000 
human beings; those of Paris 3,000,000. 
Chaldeans were, the first people who worked in metals. 
Chicago is only fifty years old, and is the eighteenth city of 
the world. 
Chinese invented paper 170 b. c. 

Chiuese in United States in 1870,63,254: Chinese in United 
States in 1880, 105,613. 

Christian Council was first held by the Aposlles in the 
year 50. 

Christmas gifts are presented in Italy on Epiphany Day, and 
St. Befana carries gifts to the children during the night. 

Columbus discovered Ameiiea October 12, 1492;* the Northmen 
A'.D. 985. 

Congress declared war with Mexico May 18, 1846; closed Feb- 
ruary 2, 1348. 
Cork is the bark taken from a species of the oak-tree. 
Daguerre aud Nieper invented the process of daguerreotype, 
ISS9. 
Dark Ages, from the sixth to the fourteenth century. 
Deaf and dumb asylum was founded in England by Thomas 
Braidwood. 1760, and the first in the United States was at Hart- 
ford, 1817. 

Egyptian pottery is the oldest known; dates from 2000 B. Q. 





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Rules for Self-Measurement 

Wc tan <u >ou accurately ic yon IbUoiv tbe 
dtrectiona given heioiv 




1 Id 2— Seek to Waist , inches 

Boat Measure, all around 

■ ni'i- --...-' 
g t.. in- ■• 

■ End OJ I nil' ----." 

-All aroUDd Neck - 
Hip McNsure to be taken all around 
i-i to 1.V- Neck to Waist 

in to it— Seam toSeam ..-..." 
18 to 19— Under Ann to Waist . . . 

21 to 2r> — Length ofShoulder - - - *' 

20 to 21— Around Waist ..... 

. von have ordered samplei ol Cloa kings, aw d made your 

selection, return it with accurate measurements aa aboi e, uud we 

will perfectly fit the measurement made. Wc cannot take back a 

garment so ordered under any circumstances, when It has ii I tu 

o i order and ie true to measurements received. 



tSfBe sure to sign your name to letters. We often receive 
money without a name signed to the letter containing it, forcing US 
lo delay till we have heard from the Postoffice where it was mailed. 

#»*-In case the goods you order are sold out, state plainly if you 
desire us to send you the nearest thing to it we have. 

JJ3f~If you order a cloak or wrap, ready made or to be made, 
consult our Rules for Self-Measurement. 

#g*Saraples are sent to all points by mail. 

flSfPe rraission to examine express packages can only be granted 
after having forwarded to us lull express rate both : 






J. J. OWN HO. 



CLOAK DEPARTMENT 

The astounding cut in prices made throughout the balance 
of our great stock of Ladies', Misses' and Children's outer 
garments, affords purchasers an opportunity that may never 
occur again, as our assortments comprise the latest styles in 
shapes, trimmings and materials, and the reduced prices 
quoted are in many cases actually less than the cost of the 
materials from which the garments are made. 

Ladies' Jersey Jackets, honeycombed pattern in black and 
colored, tailor made, reduced from $4.00 to $1.00 each. 

Ladies' Jackets, in fine quality of beaver and French 
cloaking, tailor made, bell sleeves, lap back, and bound with 
braid, reduced from $10.00 to £5.00 each. 

Ladies' Jackets, made of fine quality of imported beaver, 
tailor made, military collar, lap back, bell sleeves,, nicely 
finished with buttons, newest shades, reduced from $15.00 to 
$10.00 each. 

Ladies' Jackets, in the latest French cloaking and shades 
handsomely trimmed with Astrakhan, loose front, lap back; 
also, a fine assortment, richly braided, with vest fronts, lined 
with satin, reduced from §17.50 to §12.50 each. 

Ladies' Close-fitting Newmarkets in a fancy striped mate- 
rial, tailor made, bell sleeves, shirred back, military collar, 
very stylish, worth §10; reduced to §6.50 each. 

Ladies' Newmarkets, made of a fancy striped and checked 
material, plaited front, half-tight fitting, bell sleeves, shirred 
and plaited backs, very handsome, worth §15; reduced to 
§8.50 each. 

Ladies' Newmarkets, made of striped French cloaking, in 
all the new shades, tailor made, bell sleeves, military collar, 
shirred back and handsomely finished with buttons, very 
stylish, worth §20; reduced to §12.50 each. 

Ladies' Newmai-kets in striped and plain cloaking, plaited 
fronts, half-tight fitting, cloth buttons, handsome girdle 
around waist, bell sleeves, very stylish, worth §25; reduced 
to §15 each. 

Ladies' Wraps, made of fine black cloth, trimmed with 
heavy drop fringe, handsome ornament on front, long-pointed 
tabs, lined all through with quilted satin, reduced from 
§22.50 to §12.50 each. 

Ladies' Wraps of fine French cloaking, elegantly trimmed 
with corded passementerie, long-pointed tabs, trimmed with 
handsome corded and drop fringe, lined with heavy-quilted 
satin, reduced from §25 to §15 each. 

Ladies' Circulars in fine French cloaking, figured and 
brocaded, gathered shoulders, also gathered back, with 
handsome ribbon bow at neck, in all sizes, worth §10, 
reduced to §5 each. 



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CLOAK DEPT— Continued 

xed material, gathered shoul- 
. trimmed with ribbon, reduced from $15 

rculara in fine plain cloaking, gathered shoul- 
rolhered back, finished at nerk with elegant 

ii London dyed, satin lined, 
nek, finished with ornaments on front, reduced 
from $17.50 to $10 each. 

te Jackets, real London dyed, satin 
lined, lap back, finished willi ornaments on front, 
■ i to $12.60 each. 

i te l'lush Jackets, real Lon- 
don dyed, satin lined, lap hack and handsomely finished 
with sealskin ornaments on front, reduced from $:;5.0u to 
each. 
Ladies' Scilette Jackets, real London dyed, satin 
lined, lap back, finished with sealskin ornaments on 
front, reduced from $80.00 to $20.00. 

Ladies' Sealette Wraps, lone tabs, cape back, trimmed 
all around with sealette drop fringe, reduced from $25.00 
to $15.00 each. 

Ladies' Sealette Wraps, long tabs, cape back, trimmed 
all around with sealette drop fringe, reduced from $30.00 
to $20.00 each. 

Ladies' Sealette Wraps, long tabs, pointed backs, with 
ornaments, rolling collar, with three sealskin ornaments 
on front, also with Japanese sleeves, plaits in the back, 
fringed all around with drop fringe, reduced from $35.00 
to $25.00 each. 

Misses' Circulars in fine French cloaking, figured 
and brocaded, gathered shoulders, also gathered back, 
finished with handsome ribbon bow at neck, reduced 
from $0.50 to $3.50 each. 

Misses' Circulars in plain and fancy mixed material, 
gathered shoulders, plaited back, trimmed with ribbon 
bow at neck, reduced from S7.50 to $4.50 each. 

Mis-sea' Long Cloaks, made of nice quality of striped 
cloaking with cap?, and finished witu nice clasp in 
front, ages from 6 to 14 vears, reduced from $3.00 and 
$0.50 to $2.50 and $3.50 each. 

.Misses' Long Cloaks of fancy striped cloaking, gath- 
ered backs, with belt, shoulder cape, fancy buttons to 
match material, ages 4 to 14 years, reduced from $5.00, 
$0.(10 and $7.00 to $3.00, $4.00 and $5.'J0 each. 

fj&'l-n. ordering children's garments, send age and 
bust measure. 



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■dispossessing exclusive privileges of perfect light and ventilation, ^ 
our palrons cap. thoroughly examine our stock, with the greatest O 
personal comfort. Sg 

.Oil-Orders by Mail or Telephone promptly filled, and forwarded «a 
by return Mail or Messenger. ■£ 

**r-Sainplessentlreeou receipt of request, to any address ^ 

*j 

05°-Our Mail Order Department i". perfect, and saves patrons their «3 
railroad fares. *J, 

4W-Purchascs delivered free of carriage charges in Oakland, Ala- .J 
racda, and Berkeley. Sg 

-Ov-When you come to town, calt on us. No trouble toshow .5 
goods, and no importuning to purchase permitted. •? 

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S INTERESTING FACTS 






HISTORICAL EVENTS— Continued 

Electrical eel is only found in the northern rivers of South 
America. 
Electricity moves 288,000 miles per second. 
Electric light invented by Lodyguiu and Kossloff at Loudon 
in 1874. 
Envelopes first used in 1839. 

Ether was first used for surgical purposes iu 1844. 
Experiments in electric lighting, by T. A. Edison, 1878-80. 
Fire insurance office, first in America, Boston, 1724. 
First American express, New York to Boston, W. F. Harden. 
First American library, fouuded at Harvard College, Cam- 
bridge, 1638. 
First Atlantic cable operated 1858. 
First authentic use of organs, 755; in England, 951. 
First cotton raised in the United States was in Virginiu, iu 
1621; first exported, 1747. 
First electric telegraph, Paddington to Drayton, Eng., 1835. 
First musical notes used, 133S; printed, 1502. 
First photographs produced in Euglaud 1802; perfected 1841. 
First postoffice established, between Vienna and Brussels, 
1516. 
First steamer crossed the Atlantic 1819. 

First sugar-cane cultivated in the United States, near New 
Orleans, 1751; first sugar-mill, 1758. 

First telegraph, in operation in America was between Wash- 
ington und Baltimore, May 27, 1844. 
First watches made in Nuremburg 1477. 
Forty-three' Popes reigned during the building of St. Peter's 
Cathedral. 
French Revolution 1789; Reign of Terror 1793. 
French and Indian war iu America 1754. 
German empire re-established January is, 1871. 
Glass was made in Egypt 3000 b. c; earliest date of transpar- 
ent glass, 719 b. c. 

Glass mirrors first made by the Venetians in the thirteenth 
century; polished metal was used before that time. 
Glass windows (colored) were used in the eighth century. 
, Great London fire occurred September 26, 1666. 

Harvard is the oldest college in the United States; established 
in 1638. 
Hawks can fly 150 miles an hour. 
Hurricanes move eighty miles an hour. 
Ignatius Loyola founded the order of Jesuits 1541. 
Introduction of homoeopathy into the United States 1825. 
Iron horseshoes were made in 481. 
Iron steamships first built in Great Britain in 1843. 
Italian and Austrian (seven weeks') war 1*66. 
Jamestown, Va., founded 1607; first permanent English set- 
tlement in America. 





COLORED DRESS GOODS 

DEPARTMENT 

n tliis important department comprise 

able goods, 

nee to the requirements oi 

-i BhadeSi colorings, weaves 

I, and all will bo closed "ill 

:it prices corresponding "ith the following stupendous 

- inch Fancy French Plaids ami 
Stripes, former pi c per yard. 

12 inch All Wool Fancy French 

Plaids and rmer price 76c, red i ■ per 

yard. 

12 inch, All Wool Fancy Stripe and 
Plaid Combination Suitings, former price $1.00, reduced 
per yard. 
At 50c ISO pieces 42 inch All Wool Fancy Ribbon 
Suitings, former price Too, reduced to 50c per 
yard. 
At 80c. 200 pieces -•'-' inch All Wool Fame Oashmi re 
-unci- price 85c, reduced to 60c per 
yard. 

At 65c. :70 pieces VI inch All Wool Fancy Cashmere 
and Broche Bordered Suitings, formerprice $1.00, reduced 
per card. 

VI inch All Wool Fancy Persian 

and Silk Bordered Suitings, former price $1.25, reduced 

per yard. 

At 75c. 120 pieces 42 inch Silk and Wool Plaid Com- 

binatii n Suitings, former price $1.50, reduced to Tec per 

yard. 



IMPORTED 



COMBINATION AND 
SUITS 

At $3.50. loii Combination Suite, former price $7,50 
reduced to $3.50 a suit. 

1 Combination Suits, JEormer price $12.50 
and $15.00, reduced to $5.0ti a suit. 

At $7.50. 125 Imported Suits, former price $20.00, 

1 "i suit. 

At $10.00. 100 Imported Suits, former price $22.50 
and $25.00, reduced to $10JK) ;t suit. 

7 VT77"77VT '7 7 7 7 /■// 7 7~7 7*7 7^7 *7 

4*S~Be sure to sign your name to letters. We often receive 
money without a name signed to the letter containing it, forcing us 
to delay till we have heard from the Postomce where it was mailed. 

-85r*In case the goods you order are sold out, state plainly if you 
desire us to send you the nearest thing to it we have. 

j*5J*If you order a cloak or wrap, ready made or to be made, 
consult our Rules for Self-Measurement. 

■ffiT-Samples are sent to all points by mail. 

tfi^r- Permission toexamine express packages can only he granted 
after having forwarded to us full express rate both ways. 



Z7 7 7 7-7-. 7 7 7- 7 7~7 777 7 7~7'7~7~7~ 7 7 7~7~* 



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INTERESTING: FACT! 






A -?iS- 






HISTORICAL EVENTS— Continued 

Jet is found along Hie coast of Yorkshire, Eug.. near Whitby. 

Jews ill the world 7,700,000. 

Julius C;esar invaded Britain 55 b. c; assassinated 44 e. c. 

Kerosene was first used for illuminating in 1826- 

Latin tou°ue heeame obsolete in 580. 

Library, first subscription, Philiidelphia, 1731. 

Life insurance, first in Loudon 1772; in America, Philadel- 
phia, 1812. 

Light moves 192,000 miles per second. 

London plague iu 1C65. 

Longest bridga in the world, the Victoria, across the St. Law- 
rence river nt Montreal, 9,144 feet. 

Longest (span) bridge, New York and Brooklyn, inaiD span, 
1,595 feet. 

Louisiana ceded by France to the United States 1803. 

Marine insurance, first a. d. 533; England, 1598; Americu, 
1721. 

Medicine was introduced iuto Rome from Greece 200 b. c. 

Michasl Augelo was the principul architect of St. Peter's 
Cathedral. 

Moderate winds blow seven miles an hour. 

Modoc war in California November 29. 1872. 

Mormons arrived at Salt Lake valley, Utah, July 24. 1817. 

Moscow, Russia, has the largest bell iu the world— 432,000 
pounds. 

Napoleon I. crowned emperor 1804; died at St. Helena 1820. 

Newspapers first printed 1494; in United States, at Boston, 
1690. 

National bank was first established in United States 1816. 

Oberliu College, Ohio, is the first in the United States that 
admitted ladies. 

Omnibuses were first made in Paris, 1827. 

Pennsylvania established the first hospital in America, in 
1751. 

Periodicals printed in the United States in 1880, 10,101. 

Phonograph invented by T. A. Edison 1877. 

Piano Forte invented in Italy about 1710. 

Postage stamps first came into u«e in England in the year 
1810; in the United States iu the year 1817. 

Printing was known in China iu the sixth century; intro- 
duced into England about 1474, America 1536. 

Professor Oersted, Copenhagen, discovered electro-magnetism 
1819. 

Public schools, first in America, were established in the New 
England States about 1G12. 

Rifle ball moves at the rate of 1,003 miles per hour. 

Robert Raikes established the first Sunday School, at Glouces- 
ter, Ens.. 1781. 

Rome was founded by Romulus 752 b. c. 





BLACK GOODSAND MOURNING 
DEPARTMENT 

as-ortments in this department comprise tho 
il th~ beet known ami most reliable 
manufacturers nil offered during this great sale- at figures 
ding with the following remarkable redu 

lonble fold .^ilk Lustre Alpaca, re- 
yard. 

At 35c. h.o pieces 38 in. Iron Frame Alpaca, reduced 
from 60c to 36c a yard. 

At 50c. 1IW pieces 44 in. All Wool French Armure, re- 
duced ironi $1 .00 to 60c a yard. 

At Oc. 50 pieces 54 in." All Wool Tricot, reduced from 
♦I.OU to 50c a yard. 

At i- in. All Wool French Foule, re- 

duced from 7oc to o'.c a yard. 

At 50c. (10 pieces 42 in. Iron Frame Alpaca, reduced 
bom $1.00 to 60c a yard. 

At G'Oc. 50 pieces 42 in. Fine Ail Wool Serge, reduced 
from if 1. 00 to 60c a yard. 

At 75c. 50 pieces 42 in. French Brocades, reduced 
from $1.25 to Toe a yard. 

At 75c. 50 pieces 42 in. Satin Merveilieux reduced 
from |1.00 to Toe. 

At 75c. 50 pieces 40 in. French Cashmero, reduced 
from $1.00 to 7:c a yard. 

At 75c. £0 pieces 42 in. French Cordaline, reduced 
rom $1.25 to 75e a yard. 

At $1.00. 40 pieces 48 in. Extra Fine French Cash- 
mere, reduced from $1.50 to $1.00 a vnrd. 

At $1.00. 40 pieces 40 in. fcilk Warp Henrietta, re- 
duced from $1.50 to $1.00 a yard. 

At ifl.Oii. 40 pieces 42 in. French Brocades, reduced 
from $1.60 to $1.01) a yard. 

At $1.25. 25 pieces 42 in. Silk Warp Drap d'Alma, re- 
duced from $2.00 to $1.25 a yard. 

At $1.25. 25 pieces 40 in. Silk Warp Henrietta, re- 
duced from $2.00 to $1.25 a yard. 

At $1.25. 25 pieces 44 in. Fxtra Fine All Wool Drap 
d'Alma, reduced from $2.00 to $1.25 a yard. 

At $1.50. 20 pieces 44 in. Extra Fine French Brocades, 
reduced from J2.50 to $1.50 a yard. 



& £ 

S» -Q5r~Po3sessing exclusive privileges of perfect light mid ventilation. •} 

t* our patrons can thoroughly examine our stock, with the greatest ^ 

? personal comfort. ^ 

^ j9S*Orders by Mail or Telephone promptly filled, and forwarded «g 

? by return Mail or Messenger. •? 

b #3~Samples sent free on receipt of request, to any address ^ 

? ^ 

4. ^g^Our Mail Order Department is perfect, and saves patrons their .« 

? railroad fares. *i 

Ig, **-Pui .hases delivered free of carriage charges in Oakland, Ala- 

^ lneda, and Berkeley. 

£• -tTi^When you come to town, calt on us. No trouble toshow «§ 

&• goods, and no importuning to purchase permitted. «S 

!* «S 



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FACTS 



Jt^lU •S'S» •»'«■ •»'«■ •»'*. •»!«• •Hfg^tt .St*. «SB> -Jti. ^t«- «MB. ■*'«• .$!£. *$£■$*(■ « 



HISTORICAL EVENTS— Continued 

st. Augustine, oldest city in the United states, founded by the 
Spaniards 1565. 

Seven Wise Men of Greece were renowned for their practical' 
sagacity and wise maxims ou the principles of life. They 
lived in the sixth century, b. c, and their names were .Stolon, 
Ohilo, Pittacua, Bias, Periander, Cleobulus and Thales. 

Seven Wonders of the World is a name given to seven very 
remarkable objects of the ancient world, as follows: The Pyra- 
mids of Egypt, Pharos of Alexandria, walls and hanging gar- 
dens of Babylon, Temple of Diana at Ephesus, the statue of the 
Olympian Jupiter, mausoleum of Artemisia and Colossus of 
Rhodes. 

Seven Hills of Rome are the hills upon which that city is 
built. Their names are the Aveutine, Capitoliue, Coelian, 
Esquiliue, Palatine, Quiriual and Viminal. Their altitude 
above the Tiber is only about 150 feet. 

Seven Sleepers, according to a legend of early Christian- 
ity, were seven noble youths of Ephesus, having tied from 
persecution to a certain cavern for refuge, where they were 
discovered and walled in for a cruel death, were made to fall 
asleep, aud in that state lived for two centuries. Their mimes 
are said to have beeu Maximian, Malchus, .Mart'iniau, Denis. 
John, Serapion aud Constantine. 

Slavery In the United States was begun at Jamestown in 1620. 

Stow rivers How seven miles per hour. 

Sound moves at the rate of 74:i miles per hour. 

Spectacles were invented by an Italian in the thirteenth 
century. 

Soap was first manufactured in England iu the sixteenth 
century. 

St. Elias, Rocky mountains, is the highest peak in North 
America— 17,850 feet. ♦ 

Storm clouds move thirty-six miles an hour. 

Telescope invented 1608. 

The first balloon ascended from Lyons, France. 1788, 

The first illumination with gas was in Cornwall, Em:., 1792; 
in the United States, at Boston, 1822. 

The first lucifer match made in 1829. 

The first Theater in the United States was at Williamsburg, 
Ya.,1752. 

The first theological seminary in the United States was estab- 
lished at Greenville, Pa., November 1, 1805. 

There are 2,750 languages and dialects. 

Volunteer fire company, first in United States, was at Phila- 
delphia, 1736. 

War declared with Great Britain 1812; pence 1S15. 

West Point Military Academy founded by Congress 180?, 




J* 4- 4" Murphy Building 4- 4 * 4« 4- 4- 4- Market & Jones Sts. 4« 4- 4-| ] 

' j yy^y ■-/. y-z 



jiom&co. 



SILK AND VELVET DEPT. 

STork 

■ 

.r.l. 

91.00, 1.25, 

SI. 00, 1.25, 1.50, 
trd. 

$1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 2.00 autl2.50 

luced to $1.00, 1.60 and ! 

nil. |.50 and 

ired Marvillieux reduced to $1.50 a yard. 
Sarah Silk, reduced t<> 50c and 75c. 

Surah Silk, reduced to 91-00 a ; 
■ red Iipiia Silfc, red iO j ard. 

Royal Silk, reduced to 91. 00a yard. 
• 1 Satins, re i 00 .i yard. 

19-inch Colored silk Velvet, reduced to 91.00, 1.25, 1 50 
and 2.00 a yard. 

■ lored Silk Plash, i 75c a 

yard. 

24-inch Black ami Colored Silk Plush, reduced to 91.25 a 

yard. 

Fancy Striped and Plaid Velvet, reduced to $1.00, 1.50 and 
ml. 
k Brocaded I 50, 2.00, 3.00 and 

4. (Ml a yard. 

Black Surah Silk, reduced to 75c, 91.00, 1.25 and 1.50 a 

i id Satin, reduced to $1.50 and 'J. 00 a 3 ard. 
< . [ored Etonian Striped silk, reduced feo 91.00, 1.25, 1.50 
and 2.00 a yard. 

raton * 'repe, reduced to Si. 00 a yard. 
28-inch Black All-Silk Velvet, reduced to 95.00, 6.00, 7.00 

yard. 
A tull line of Novelty Silka in black and colored, from si, on 
to 3.00 a yard. 



f S f S /" A s s ■/■ IT s / 

sure to sign your name to letters. We often receive 
:y without a name signed to the letter containing it, forcing us 
N to delay till we have heard from the Postoffice where it was mailed. 

A5*In case the goods yon order are sold out, state plainly if you 
desire us to send you the nearest thing to it we have. 

1 f you order a cloak or wrap, ready 
consult our Rules for Self-Measurement. 

.ffy-Samples are sent^o all points by mail. 

#»-Permission to examine express packages can only he granted 
after having forwarded (» us full express rale both ways 




feji« — 



t[ INTERESTING 1 E''4if §|fl 

■gjfr^ * .A^^A^AAAAAXAAAAXA X A AAAA.AAAJ.A *■ A A1H& fy 



GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES 

Tbe Government of the United States comprises three great 
branches, namely: the Legislative, the Judicial and the Execu- 
tive. The first makes the laws, the second construes them and 
the third enforces them. Each of these branches has its own 
separate subdivisions. 

Tbe Legislative branch consists of tbe two Houses of Con- 
gress—the Senate and the Uuusc of Representatives. 

Each State, irrespective of its size or papulation, is entitled 
to two Senators. These are elected by their respective State 
Legishitures, and hold office for a term of six years. 

The election of Senators was originally arranged, and is now 
continued, so that one-third of the Senators go out of office 
every two years. In other words, when a new Cougrcss con- 
venes two-thirds of the Senate are men who have served in that 
body for either two or four years. This plan is believed to best 
preserve the dignity and usefulness of the Senate. The dura- 
tion of ea:-h Congress is therefore two years, consisting of two 
sessions, the one a long and the other a short one. In addition 
to these regular sessions, special sessions may be called by the 
President of the United Slates. 

The qualifications of a Senator are, that he must be at least 
thirty years of age, a citizen of the State from which he is 
elected and a citizeu of the United States for nine years pre- 
ceding his election. 

The House of Representatives cousists of members chosen 
directly by the people, who hold office for two years'. 

The uumber of Representatives from any State is determined 
by its population, according to a regular apportionment, which 
isha^edupou the decennial census. Each State is, however, 
entitled to at least oue Representative. 

The qualifications of a Representative are, that he must be at 
least twenty-five years of age, at least seven years a citizen of 
the United States and an inhabitant of the State from which he 
is chosen. 

The salary of Senators and Representatives is $o,000 per annum 
each; that of the Speaker of the House $8,000. Senators and 
Representatives are also allowed twenty cents a mile as mile- 
age to and from Washington for ench annual session, and $125 
per annum for stationery and newspapers. 

The Judicial branch comprises the Supreme Court of the 
United States, United States Circuit and District Courts, the 
Court of Claims and such other courts of interior jurisdiction 
as Congress may establish. 

It is the business of these Courts to interpret and construe the 
laws made by the Legislative branch. 

The Supreme Court of the United States is the final judicial 
resort in the nation. 

The Circuit Courts each have jurisdiction over several States, 
and the District Courts usually over a porriou or a whole of a 
siDgle State. 



'^FMZt&MZ^f&^FJk.-'^ 



++ + + + + 4. + + + + + + + +-H- + + + + + + + + + + + + 






■h M urphy Building -i- & + •£■ -h -b Market & Jones Sts. -fr •}• -irf) 




LINEN DEPARTMENT 



For the pnrpT-e of re I mini; onr enormous stork in 
this lino during tlio n<>xt thirty days, wo break our Bland- 
er known on this Coast, 

•n Huck Towels, 
Size 17 x 36 inchei From $1.25. 

Ine Case Heavy 1 lurk Towels, Fino 
Linen, redn 1, 75. 

■ $1.75 a Do*. Two Cases Soft Finish Blenched 
Huck All l.inen Towels, size 18 I 33 inches, reduced from 

a $2.60 a Do*. 2 lots elegant All Linen Towels, 
Unmask or Huck, with Knotted Fringes, reduced from 
■ 

Now $4.00 a Doz. One Lot-Extra Vine Damask Towels, 
laruc sizes. Knotted Fringes, reduced fiom |(U0 

Now $1.25 a Doz. 200 Dozen U Damask Napkins (25 
inches square), All Linen, reduced from $1.75. 

Now $1.75 a Doz. 150 Dozen 25 inch square German 
All Linen Napkins, very serviceable, reduced from $2.25. 

Now 50c a Doz. 750 Dozen 14 inch Fringed All Linen 
Napkins (checked) reduced from 60c. 

Now Tic a yard. 25 pieces Fine Bleached Table Dam- 
ask, Satin Finish, reduced from 85c. 

Now 35c a yard. 20 pieces Bleached Table Linen, re- 
duced from 5Uc. 

Now 20c a yard. One Case Heavy Loom Table Linen, 
reduced from 30c. 

Now 40c a yard. Two Cas^s Undressed Cream Table 
Linen, in a variety of good patterns, reduced from GUc. 

Now 55c a yard. 4u pieces Very Heavy Unbleached 
Table Linen, Uli inches wide, reduced from 75c. 

Now 10c a yard. ISO pi ces Check Glass Linen, 18 
inches wide, warranted fine flax, reduced from 12^c. 

Now lO^jc a yard. 25 pieces Very Choice Glass Linen, 
23 inches wide, heavy texture, reduced from 25c. 

J< T ow G'-ic a yard. 100 pieces Bleached All Linen 
Crash, reduced from 10c a yard. 

Now 10;jc a yard. 2>6 pieces Best Bleached Twill 
Toweling, 10 inches wide, reduced from 25c. 

A Full Line of Fringed Lunch Sets, Cloths and Nap- 
kins to match, from $4.00 to $20.03 a set, all reduced. 

Cotton and Linen Diaper in 18 in., 10 in., 22 in., 24 in. 
and 27 inch, in 10 yard pieces, from 75c to $3.00 a piece. 



{• W W WW W WWWWW~WW"W"W~ ; Jiv'WWWW< 

'*. £ 

^ J)Sr*Possessing exclusive privileges orperfect light nnd ventilation, «J 

£» our patrons can thoroughly examine our slock, with the greatest ^ 

v> personal comfort. ^ 

2» BSj" Orders by Mail or Telephone promptly filled, and forwarded " 

§• by return Mail or Messenger. 

?• ^./'Samples scut free on receipt of request, to any address ^! 

? ^5 

z. 4^T"Our Mail Order Department i-i perfect, and saves patrons their ^ 

? railroad fares. ^ 

*• fl®»Purchases delivered free of carriage charges in Oakland, Ala- ^ 

v* racda.and Bcrkel' v «S 

& <Q5y-When you come to town, enll on us. No trouble to show 

\? goods, and no importuning to purchase permitted. 

^<tZ.->lz.->!z^?Z;-«fe^!z--*'^'fr-^ 






gggr J.J.O'BH&C0.*%| a 



BLANKET DEPARTMENT 

In this department we carry complete lines of goods, 
embracing all grades from the ordinary to the finest, ami 
for the next 30 days will offer the following astonishing 
bargains : 

At $1.00 a pair. 2 lots Blankets, White or Gray; 10-4 
size; summer weights. Reduced from $1.25. 

At $2.00 a pair. 1 case 10-4 White Blankets, Eastern 
manufacture. Reduced from $2.75. 

At $3.50 a pair. 2 cases 12-4 White Blankets; good 
heavy goods. Reduced from $4.50. 

At $4.75 a pair. 5 cases Housekeepers' White Family 
Blankets; fine California goods. Reduced from $6.00. 

At $5.75 a pair. 10 cases Heavy Mission White Blan- 
kets; excellent goods. Reduced from $7.50. 

At $7.00 a pair. 3 cases Elite. Mission Fine White 
Blankets. Reduced from S9.00. 

At $8.50 a pair. 2 cases extra Golden Gate Fine White 
Blankets (Australian Wool). Reduced from $11.50. 

At $12.50 a pair. 1 case "Exhibition" White Blankets; 
almost finest goods made; 90 inches wide. Reduced 
from $17.50. 

At $10.00 a pair. 2 cases Fine Mission Blankets; size 
72x!)0 inches, in light blue, with white border. Reduced 
from $14.50. 

At $2.50 a pair. 35 pairs Golden Gate Crib Blankets. 
Reduced from $3.50. 

At $3.75 a pair. 50 pairs Sky-blue Crib Blankets; 
finest wool. Reduced from $5.00. 

At $4.00 a pair. 125 pairs Fine Mission Blankets for 
large cribs or cots. Reduced from $6.00. 

At $3.00 a pair. 200 pairs Heavy Gray Blankets; good 
soft stock. Reduced from $4.00. 

At $4.50 a pair. 100 pairs 7-pound Gray Blankets; 
full 72 inches wide. Reduced from $6. 

At $5.00 a pair. 125 pair California Fine Gray Blan- 
kets; extra size. Reduced from $6.50. 

At $9.00 a jjair. A full line Fine Colored Blankets,.in 
Oxford, Vicuna, Scarlet, etc. Reduced from $11.50. 

At $10 a pair. A small lot 10-pound superior grade 
Colored Blankets. Reduced from $12.50. 




J. J. O'BRIEN & CO.*' 






LACE CURTAIN DEPARTMENT 

; pped in the 

uied 

1 for public inspection, and as 

from the European 

nuuiul ■ are enabled to orter exceptionally low 

Ladiea intent on adorning anil beautifying tlieir hon 

mould examine the following list of bar- 
<v the next thirty days: 

ogham Curtains, 'A yards long, 
I Reduced from $1 .00. 
rioeable Guipure Curtains, in good 
styles. Former price $1.35. 

Nov $1, 50 a pair — Excellent Style Nottingham Curtains, 
white or ecru. Redueed from $2.00. 

Now 12.75 a pair— Superior Grade Bay Window Curtains, 
extra wide. Reduced from $4.00. 

Now $3.00 a pair- Turcoman Portieres, neat dadoes. 
Reduced from $4. oo. Colors, garnet, old gold and blue. 

Now $5.00 a pair—Fine Turcoman Portieres, deep chenille 
dadoes. Reduced from $7.50. 

Now $8.75 a pair— Fine All-chenille Portieres, very rich. 

om so.oo. 

Now $6.00 a pair— One lot Irish Point (or Renaissance) 
Curtains, very choice. Reduced from $9.Q0. 

Row $9.00 a pair— "200 pairs extra grade Irish Point Cur- 
tains, in small lots of 3 to 6 pairs of a pattern. Reduced 
from $12.00, $13.50 and si 5. 00. 

Now 35c a yard — Fine Tinted Genuine Madras, 50 inches 
wide. Reduced from 50c. 

Now 50c a yard — 10 styles Cardinal-colored .Madras, 50 
inches wide. Reduced from 75c. 

Now 40c each — Curtain Poles, 5 feet long, in walnut, 
ebon}' or cherry colors, all trimmed in brass. Reduced from 
50c. 

Now "5c each — Curtain Poles, 10 feet long, same colors 
and complete brass trimmings. Reduced from $1.00. 

Now $2.00 each — Handsome Fringed Table Covers, in 
wool, new colors. Reduced from $3.00. 

Now 50c each — Raw Silk Covers, from 50c to $5.00, all 
reduced. 

Now 50c a yard — Heavy Tapestry for Furniture Cover- 
ing, 50 inches wide. Reduced from 65c. 

Furniture Fringes, in all grades and colors, similarly 
reduced. 

Piano Covers in all styles and sizes. 



.95F"Be sure to sign your name to letters. We often receive 
money without a name signed to the letter containing it, forcing us 
to delay till we have heard from the Postoffice where it was mailed. 

-BSJ-In case the goods you order are sold out, state plainly if you 
desire us to send you the nearest thing to it we have. 

-G3*-If you order a cloak or wrap, ready made or to be made, 
consult our Rules for Self-Measurement. 

«3*Satnples are sent to all points by mail. 

&tr~Permission to examine express packages can only be granted 
after having forwarded to us full express rate both ways. 



'• Mi. .SK. *B. .St^M- .JI4. •*>«• -515- -V<. JKi -Mi- ^'^SK. -SW- -.VS. .J«. *«. ,y^}'«. .S , 

T- J» * M m T M M — — * — -| — M MM MM MM M W »~W T *^ ' ^ ^-^ M "■ W *V M>^ M ^ M 1 kB> * " 




Continued 

The Court of Claims is the only court in which suits on claims 
agaiDst the United States can be brought, and over such it has 
exclusive jurisdiction. 

All Judges nre appointed by the President, subject to the 
confirmation of the Senate. They hold their offices during 
good behavior, and can only be removed by impeachment. 

The Judges of the Supreme Court are ex-officio Circuit Judges, 
holding terms of Court at regular periods in the respective cir- 
cuits which are assigned to them. 

The salary of the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court is $10,- 
500 per anuum; of the Associate Juslices $10,000 each. 

The Executive branch consists of the Presideut, Vice-Pres- 
ident, the Cabinet and the large force of subordinates whose 
several departments of business come under the control and 
supervision of these superiors. 

The President and Vice-President are elected every four 
years. The qualifications for President an3 Vice-President are, 
that they must be native-born citizens of the United States, 
residents thereof at least fourteen years and at least thirty-five 
years of age. 

The Presideut is cz-ojficio Commander-in-Chief of the Army 
and Navy. He appoints Cabinet, Judicial and Executive offi- 
cers, with the cousent of the Senate, except those whose 
appointment comes within the operation of the Civil Service 
Act. His salary is $50,000 per annum. 

The Vice-President is ex-offlcio President of the Senat\ and 
in the event of death or other incapacity of the President the 
latter's duties devolve upon him. His salary is $8,000 per 
annum, as is also that, of each of the Cabiuet officers, 

The Cabinet consists of seven officers, each the head of sepa- 
rate administrative departments. 

The Secretary of State has the custody of the great seal, 
which, at the President's direction, he affixes to official docu- 
ments. He treats with foreign natious, through their resident 
ministers, conducts correspondence with our ministers resident 
abroad, grants passports, etc. 

The Secretary of the Treasury superintends the financial 
affairs of the Government; he recommends to Congress 
measures which, in his judgment, will advantage the nation's 
credit, etc., negotiates loans, settles public accounts, etc. 

The Secretary of War has control of the nation's military 
affairs, constructs fortifications, directs surveys, and has super- 
vision of the Engineer, Subsis'euce, Ordinance, Topographical, 
Medical and Quartermaster-General's Bureaus ana the Adjn- 
tant-GeuTal's office. 

The Secretary of the Navy bus charge of all imvnl affairs aud 
of the bnrcans that are naturally uppurteuant thereto, such as 
Nnvy Yards, Construction, etc. 




-r- •£■ -h Murphy Building -fr 4* *fr 4* ■*• »fr Market & Jones £ts. 4"fr ■fr'j 



J. J. O'BRIEN & CO. 



fcdimnlfc Jit. J" in. JH.JM. jh. -an. .an. >m> . ov ^vMf. -ve. ■?»>, .vt. -w, j 1 
DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT 

irryiog a full line of .»!! makes in Staple Domestic 

we offer them .it about 

j timiu- benefit to housekeepers 

lock daring this unprecedented 



Twilled Scarlet Flannel. Reduced 
from 80a a, yard. 

yard Lan Twilled Flannel. 

1 from 50c. 

At 60a a yard — 7-OB. Twilled Scarlet Flannel. Reduced 
from 

At 25c a yard— 20 pieces Cray Twilled Flannel, all pure 
Reduced from 55c. 

At 45c a yard- 25 pieces Heavy Navy Blue Twilled Flan- 
nel, full 7-oz., cloth finish. Reduced from G5c. 

At 51>j a yard— 2 cases Heavy All-wool French Striped 
Flannel, new colorings. Reduced from G5c. 

At 25c a yard — 50 pieces French All-wool Wrapper Flan- 
nel, in plaids only. Reduced from 50c. 

At l(S]c a yard— A small lot Tenuis Flannel. Reduced 
from 25 

At 45c a yard— A Hue line Striped Eider Down Flannel. 
Reduced from 65c. 

At 23c a yard — 20 pieces Fine White Shaker, Flannel, full 
yard wide. Reduced" from 35c. 

At 75c a yard— 100 pieces All-wool Heavy Tweed, for 
Boys' Suiting, good colorings. Reduced from $1.00. 

At 40c a yard — Fine Opera Flannels, in all colors. Reduced 
from 50c. 

At 45c a yard — 203 pieces Scotch Shirting Flannels, in 
plaids and stripes. Reduced from 00c. 

At "Ac a yard— 2 cases Unbleached Canton Flannel. Re- 
duced from 10c. 

At 124c a yard — 5 cases very heavy Unbleached Canton 
Flannel. Reduced from 15c. 

At 75c a yard—Fine Embroidered White Flannel, for 
Skirts, flannel full yard wide. Reduced from Si. 00. 

At .SI. 15 a yard — Handsome Embroidered Flannel, in a 
variety of new designs. Reduced from ."$1.50. 

Sheeting Price List— Fruit of Loom, Masonville, Golden 
Wedding, etc., 10c a yard. 

New York Mills, Nonpareil, Utica, Wamsutta, etc., ll^c 
a yard. 

Lonsdale Cambric, Wamsutta Cambric and English Long 
Cloth 124c. 



I 



^ flf •?&• 1& ^ *?lv* *?i«" -fts- *?*«• •?*«• *««• •S'tf* -?i«" ^? *?iS- 'A* *W Ifr 4l < i"7Sr , 7 

U £ 

fc» /KS^ Possessing exclusive privileges of perfect 1 igh t and ventilation , ^ 

£» our patrons can thoroughly examine our stock, with the greatest •$ 

? personal comfort. *j 

£• <8S?-Ordersby Mail or Telephone promptly filled, and forwarded «5 

? by return Mail or Messenger. _ ^ 

£• 4 ^-Samples sent free ou receipt cf rcqucst.'to any address «i 

,? ^ 

^ -ttS^Our Mail Order Department ;j perfect, and r.avea patrons their ^ 

,? railroad fares. ^ 

<£• -(^"Purchases delivered free of carriage charges in, Oakland, Ala- ^ 

fc 1 meda, and Berkeley. *J 

|4» ifiTWhen you coine to town, call on us. No trouble to show •& 

S* goods, and no importuning to purchase permitted. ^ 

«• " «&' 






- j»- *R- •»!«• t'Sf •?!*■ ">!«■ l^rTif •»!«■ -ft^ •»!«• ■>!*• •»!«• "?«-=ifi"®. -®- •fl^fiva 



INTERESTING FAQTS 






LV5 







GOVERNMENT T T . S.— Continued 

The Secretary of the tnterior has control of Indian Affairs 
Pensions, Patents, Census, Public Buildings, General Lund 

Oilier. etO. 

The Postmaster-General has control of all postal arrange- 
ments, both in the United States and with foreign nations. 

The Attorney General is the head of the Department of 
Justice. He is the legal counsel fortin; President and other 
Government officials. Etisthe busincssof this department to 
advise them, and give them and the national rights protection. 



NAMES OF STATES AND TERRITORIES, 

With Their Derivations, Fictitious Names, 

Election' Days and Governor's Salary 

Alabama (Ala.)— The name is of Greek origin, signifying 

"here we rest." Alabama was admitted into the Union in 

.1819. The State election day is the first Monday in August. 

The Governor is elected for a term of two years, with an annual 

salary of $8,000. The capital is Montgomery. 

Arizona (Ariz.)— An Indian word, meaning " sandhills," The 
Governor has a term of office of four years, and a salary of 
$2,600 per annum. The election occurs on the Tuesday after the 
first Monday in November. Prescott is the capital. 

Arkansas (Ark.)— French and Indian words, signifying " bow 
of smoky waters." The fictitious name of the Stale is "Bear 
State." from the number of these animals formerly found 
there. Arkansas was admitted into the Union iu 1836. The 
Governor is elected for two years, with a salary of 38,000. 
The state election occurs on the first Monday in September, 
The capital is Little Rock, - 

California (Calif.) — From Spanish worda, meaning '• hot fur- 
nace." The fictitious name is the "Golden State." California 
was admitted into the Union in 1850. The Governor is elected 
for four years, at a salary of $(J,O0O annually. The State elec- 
tion is held on the Tuesday after the first Monday in Novem- 
ber. The capital is Sacramento. 

Colorado (Colo.)— Spanish v. 6rd, meaning "colored." Colorado 
was admitted as a state in 1876. The Governor is elected on the 
Tuesday after tbe first Monday iu November, for a term of two 
yejirs, with a salary of ¥5,000. The capital is Denver. 



■ / / y / / / / / s / s s / / s s s / y -y -r -/ s -r s A ^ 

Sl+ 4- -J- ■*-.+ 4- + + + + + + 4- + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + ^Tpl 




JIOlM&EO.Xi 




COMFORTERS. Etc. 

We nave made buds! intial reductions throughout this 
traent, and intending purchasers should not delay 

ins in non.li cannot laal 

at the low : 

At S3.00 each. 300 Terry Bedspreads (new), in Pink, 
in, Light Blue and White. Full size. Reduced from 

At (3.75 ea :h, 2 cases Genuine French Marseilles Bed- 
Bne i.'.ii«ls. Reduced from Si. 00. 

At $2.50 each, 3 cases 12-4 Heavy English Marseilles 
Bedspreads. Heduvd from - 

At $1.50 each, 1 case 12-4 Heavy Marseilles Spreads. 
Reduced from $-J.oi. 

At $1 .00 each, 2 cases mil size Crochet Spreads, Mar- 
seilles finish. Reduced from $1.25. 

At $7.00 each, one lot Genuine Eider Down Comforters. 
Redui 1.50. 

At $2.50 each, 12 doz. 20-inch square, fine Sateen 
I Eider I 'own Pillows. Reduced from $3.50. 

At vl .<■■ a yard, 25 pieces Twilled Cretonne. Reduced 
from 15 

At 50c. each, 20 doz. Ladies' Cloth Skirts; good dark 
colors. Reduced from 75c. 

At 90c. each. 10 doz. Ladies' Knitted Worsted Under- 
skirts; heavy texture, full sizes. Reduced from $1.25. 

At $1.25 each, a fine line Quilted Farmers' Satin 
Skirts: lined. Reduced from $1.75. 

At $1.25 each, fine Felt .Mantel Lambrequins. Reduced 
from si. 75. 

At $2.60 each, 6 doz. Elaborate Mantel Lambrequins, 
in several colors. Reduced from $3.50. 

All Qur Ginghams, Seersuckers, etc., reduce. 1. 

White Goods, Piques and Marseilles reduced. 

Silk and Nottingham Tidies and Pillow Shams reduced. 

Nottingham, Guipure and Antique Lace Bed Sets 
reduced. 

Smyrna Rugs, in all sizes, reduced, etc., etc. 



93-Be sure to sign your name to letters. We often receive 
money without a name signed to the letter containing it, forcing us 
to delay till we have heard from the Postoffice where it was mailed, 

*S-In case the goods you order are sold out, state plainly if you 
desire us to send you the nearest thing to it we have. 

i you order a 'cloak or wrap, ready mad^ or to be made, 
lilt our Rules tor Self-Measurement. 

#» -Samples are sent to all points by mail. 

A3°-Permission to examine express packages can only be granted 
after having forwarded to us full express rate both ways, 



:jj — f v_»_fi 



TERESTING FACTS : 



MR m^lii 







NAMES OF STATES, ETC.— Continued 

ConH«i/<?H( (Conn.)— An Indian name, signifying "the long 
river." The nicknames are "Freestone State,' 1 "Nutmeg State" 
and "Land of Steady Habits." The Governor is elected for two 
years, with a salary of $2,000. The State election day is the Tues- 
day after the first Monday iu November. Connecticut was one of 
ihe original thirteen States. The capital is Hartford. 

Delaware (Del.)— Named in honor of Lord de la Ware. It is called 
the " Diamond State," from its small size and intrinsic worth, 
also " Blue Hen State." ]t was one of the thirteen original States. 
The Governor is elected for four years, at u salary of J.2,000. The 
State election day is the Tuesday after the first Monday in Novem- 
ber. The capital is Dover. 

Florida (Fla.)— From the Spanish, meaning "flowery;" so called 
from the abundance of (lowers aud the day (Easter Suuday) upon 
which it was discovered. From its shape it is sometimes called 
the " Peninsular State." Florida was admitted into the Union iu 
1845. The Governor is elected for four years, on the Tuesday after 
The first Monday in November; salary 43,500 pcrauuum. The capi- 
tal is Tallahassee. 

Georgia (Ga.) — Named in houor of King Georere II of Eneland. 
The nickname is the " Empire State of the South." The Governor 
is elected for two years, on the first Wednesday iu October. He 
has a salary of $3,00) per annum. Georgia was one of the thirteen 
original States. The capital is Atlanta. 

Idaho Ter.— The Governor is appointed for four years, at a salary 
of ?2,G00 per annum. The general election day is the first Tuesday 
after the first Monday in November. The capital is Boise City. 

Illinois (III.)— An Indian name, signifying "tribe of men." The 
sobriquet is "Prairie State." also "Sucker State." Illinois was 
admitted into the Union in 1818. The Governor is elected for four 
years, with a salary of $6,000. The State election is held on the 
Tuesday after the first Monday iu November. The capital is 
Springfield. 

Indiana (Ind.)— So called from the Indians. The original mean- 
ing of the word India is "river." The nickname is " Hoosier 
State." Indiana was admitted into the Union in 1816. The Gover- 
nor is elected every four years, with a salary of £ 5,000. Thegeueral 
election day is the Tuesday aiter the first Monday in November. 
The capital is Indianapolis. 

Iowa (la.)— An Indian word, meaning ''the sleepy ones." The 
fictitious name is "The Hawkeye State." Iowa was admitted iuto 
the Union in 1S-16. The Governor is elected for a term of two 
years, at $3,020 per annum. The State election occurs ou the Tues- 
day after the second Monday in October, except in Presidential 
election years, wheu it occurs ou the first Tuesday after the first 
Monday in November. The capital is Des Moines. 

Kansas (Kan.)— Indian word, signifying "smoky watc." The 
sobriquet is "Gardeu of the West." Kansas was admitted as a 



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iS'WTJTi? 1 ^.'' ■ * . '""?.?*** ** 







LACE DEPARTMENT 

varied ami 
I It includes all 
md intricate designs, attc 

nderyat lc, 2 
yard. 
nbnrg Flouncing, 22 inches wide, at 30c, 35c, 40c, 
yard. 
Hamburg Flouncing, 27 inches wide, at 60c, 60c, 73c, S5c, 

,1 1.23 per 3 
Swiss . 22 inches wide, at 30c, 35c, 50c, GOc, 75c 

* per van I. 

u Flouncing, 27 inches wide, at 50c, 00c, 75c and $1.00 
per yard. 

Swiss Skirting, 40 to 45 inches wide, at 35c, 40c, 50c, GOc, 

tK) per yard. 
hemstitched Edgings, Floancings and Skirtings at greatly 
reduced prices. 

Real Linen Torchon Lace, at 2c, 3c, 4c, 5c, Ojc, 7£c, 10c, 
12$c, 15c, 20c anil '25c per yard. 

I Linen Medieis Lace, at 3c, 5c, 7 Ac, 10c, 12ic, 15c, 20c, 
25c. 30c to 50c per yard. 

Torchon and Medieis Inserting at greatly reduced prices. 
Ladies* Printed Bordered Hemstitched Handkerchiefs, 
reduced to 4c, 5c. GJc, S*c and IOc each. 

Ladies Hand -embroidered Hemstitched Handkerchiefs, 
reduced to I2£c, 15c, 20c and 25c each. 

Black Spanish Guipure i ace Scarfs, all Silk, 3 yards long, 
at 91.50, 1.75, 2.00, 2.25 and 2.50 each. 

Black Hand-run Spanish Lace Scarfs, extra long, at S3.00, 
4.03, 5.00, G.OO, 7.50, S.50, 10.00, 12.50 to 15.00 each. 

Real Duchesse Lace Handkerchiefs, at 50c, 75c, 95c, $1.25, 
1.5 t, 1 75, 2.00 and 2.50 each. 

Cream Oriental Lace Skirting, 42 inches wide, reduced to 
50c and 75c per yard. 

Cream Normandy Valenciennes Laca Skirting, 42 inches 
wide, reduced to 05c. S5c and $1.00 per yard. 

Black Spanish Guipure Lace Skirting, 42 inches wide, 
reduced to Si. 00, 1.25, 1.50 and 2.00 per yard. 

Black Chautilly Lace Skirting, 42 inches wide, reduced to 
$1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 1.75, 2.00, 2.50 and' 3.00 per yard. 

Black and Cream Fish Net, 45 inches wido, reduced to 75c, 
85c and $1.00 per yard. 

( rauze and Tinsel Drapery for evening wear, 45 inches wide, 
in all colors, reduced to $1.75 per yard. 

Vandyke Lace, in Black, Cream and Beige, at greatly 
reduced prices. 



& £ 

fr ASF-Possessing exclusive privileges of perfect light and ventilation , *} 

5» our patrons can thoroughly examine our stock, with the greatest ^ 

F personal comfort. *5 

g» A3~Orders by Mail or Telephone promptly filled, and forwarded «S 

^ by return Mail or Messenger. •§ 

g* AS 1 " Samples sent free on receipt of request, to any address ' »S 

«• % 
J®~Our Mail Order Department is perfect, and saves patrons their »g 
railroad fares. *3 

& 4^- Purchases delivered free of carriage charges in Oakland, Ala- «a 

? meda. and Berkeley. ^ 

& .flES-When you come to town, call on us. No trouble to show ^ 

F goods, and no importuning to purchase permitted. <f 

'< sS 



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IIM INTERESTING; 



FACTS; 



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NAMES OF STATES, ETC.— Continued 



State in 1861. The Governor is elected fur two years, at a salary of 
$3,000 annually. The State election occurs on the Tuesday after 
the first Monday in November. The capital is Topeka. 

Kentucky (Ky.)— Indian name, signifying "the dark and bloody 
ground." The nickname is "The Corn-cracker State." The Gov- 
eruor is elected on the first Monday in August, for a term of four 
years, at a salary of $.3,001) per annum. Kentucky was tin- first 
.State admitted into the Union, in 1792. The capital is Frankfort. 

Louisiana (La.)— Named in honor of King Louis XIV of France. 
The sobriquet is "The Creole State." Louisiana was admitted 
into the Union in 1812. The Governor is elected for four years, at 
|4,000 per annum. The State election day is the Tuesday after the 
third Monday in April.' The capita), is Baton Rouge. ■ 

Maine (Me.) — So called from Maine in France. The fictitious 
uame ja "The Pine Tree State." The Governor is elected on the 
second Monday in September, for a term of two years, at ij2,0Q0 per 
annum. The State was admitted into the Union in 1820. The 
capital is Augusta. 

Maryland (Md.)— Named in honor of Queen Henrietta Maria of 
England. The Governor's salary is $4,500 annually. He is elected 
for four year-, on the Tuesday after the hrst Monday in November. 
Maryland was one of the thirteen original States. The capital is 
Annapolis. 

Massachusetts (Mass.)— An Indian word, signifying " blue bills.* 1 
The fanciful uame is •' The Bay state." Massachusetts was one of 
the thirteen original States. The Governor is elected on the Tues- 
day afterthe first Monday iu November, for one year, with a salary 
of $4,000. The capital is Boston. 

Michigan (Mich.)— Indian word, meaning •• the lake country." 
It is nicknamed " The Wolverine State." The Governor is elected 
for two rears, at a salary of $1,000 annually. The State election 
day is the Tuesday after the first Monday in November. Michigan 
was admitted as a State in 1837. The capital is Lansing. 

Minnesota (Minn.)— From Indian words, meaning "cloudy water." 
It is called •■ The Gopher state." The Governor is elected on the 
Tuesday after the first Monday in November, for a term of two 
vears, at a salary of $3,800 annually. Minnesota was admitted into 
the Union in 1858. The capital is St. Paul. 

Mississippi (Miss;) — Indian word for "Father of "Waters." it is 
nicknamed "The Bayou State." Mississippi was admitted into 
the Union iu 1817. The Governor is elected for four years, on the 
Tuesday after the first Monday in November, with a salary of $4,000 
per annum. The capital is Jackson. 

Missouri (Mo.)— Indian word, meaning "muddy water. "j The 
Governor is elected every four years, on the Tuesday after the 
first Monday in November. He has a Hilary of $5,000 yearly. 
Missouri was admitted into the Union as a State in 1821. The 
capital is Jefferson City. 




fHf" 4- 4- Murphy Building 4- + 4- 4- 4- 4* Market & Jones Sts. 4- 4* 4-IS 



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HOSIERY DEPARTMENT 
In n department can be 

M<11.'-' alld 1 

3 of the world, bo varied 
■it Hi" wan 
ver than ovei 
do well and consult their own interests 
nderful bargains in this line before 
making their purcha 

Reduced 1 I idies' solid Colored Hose, full 

finished, in naw. soul and garnet, with whit 

Vn immense assortment of Ladies' Fancy 
it conceivable style known to the 
trade, such as fast blacks, solids, stripes and fancj 
Btyl :ed to 25c. 

Large lines of Ladies' llnsi'. superior tnanu- 
' re, iii black, solids, stripes and combinations. 
Black warranted Fast. 

35c. Ladies' Extra Fine French Cotton Hose. 
fancv stripes, solid colors and black, worth 65c. Reduced 

At 50c. 100 do ! Extra Fine French Cotton 

Hose, ncwe-i slipper patterns, 20 different styles, worth 
75c. lie lu 

At 50c. Ladies' French Lisle Richelieu, rib, black, 
; ~ an 1 fancy; also embroidered, suitable for slipper 
wear. 

At 50c. Ladies' 'Imported Cashmere Wool Hose, in 
black, garnet, navy and seal. 

Ladies' Fancy Frencl 11 lose, and Black, at $1.00, 
1.50,1.75,2.00,2 50.4.00,5.00,7.00, 9.00 a pair. 

At $1.00. Ladies' French Lisle Hose, best quality, in 
fancv embroidered, .slipper pattern and vertical stripes, 
worth i(l'. Reduced to.1d.00. 

lies' Fine English Cashmere Wool Hose, at 50c, 
75c. $1.00, 1.25, 1.50. 

Reduced to 15c. Children's Ribbed Hose, in black, 
with white l'eet; full finished; 5 to S'.i inches; former 
price, 25c. 

At 25c. Children's 7 and 1 Rib French Cotton Hose, 
solid colors and black; extra value: all sizes, 25c. 

Af 86c. Children's C and G French Cotton Hose, 
warranted fast colors ; sizes 7 to «',. 35c. 

At 25c. Children's Derby Kib Hose, solid colors; 5 to 
8>i ; worth 75c, now 25c. 

Infante' Cotton Lis! arid Cashmere Hose at 25c 
upwards. 

I '!:l ' .'"'I.:.:!/ ^ .:,:'!'. ! 'i;.::.'r : : . ' , :.i l-ii. !;:i : .:'::| :i.-v; : i; ■ .■■-,■:;. i r ;■ !'! 

i Be Bure to sign jrour name to letters. We often receive 
m money without ft name sighed to the letter containing it, forcing ui 
m to delay till we he el ftce where it was mailed. ^ 

#»~In ense the goods you order are sold out, si ate plaiuly if you = 
H desiri u to tid you the nearest thing to it we .have. 

% 49~If you order .i cloak or wrap, ceadyraadc or to in- made, j§ 

Icusurement. §| 

M 1 1 1 . 1 e . are sent tu all points by mail. 
tfg-[v packagl in led 

ing forwarded to us fullexprest ti ways. 

^iiiUiiiuiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiii'iNiiiiiuiiii^:' 



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J| INTERESTING: FACTS} 






NAMES OF STATES, ETC.— Continued 

Montana (Mont.)— The Governor is elected for a term of four 
years, on tfa.2 first Tuesday after the first Monday hi November. 
Montana was admitted into the Union in*l£S9. The capital is 
Helena. 

Nebraska (Neb.)— An Indian word, meaning "shallow river." 
The general election day is the Tuesday after the first Monday in 
November. The Governor is elected for two years, at $2,5C0 per 
auuum. Nebraska was admitted into the Union in 1867. The 
capital is Lincoln. 

Nevada (Nev.)— Spanish word, meaning "snowclad." The ficti- 
tious name is "The Sage-hen State." Nevada was admitted into 
the Union in 1S6-J. The Governor is elected on the Tuesday after 
the first, Monday in November, for a term of four years, at an 
annual salary of $5,C00. The capital is Carson City. 

New Hampshire (N. H.)— Named from Hampshire County, Eng- 
land. The sobriquet is "The Granite State." The Governor is 
elected on the Tuesday after the first Monday in Sovember, for a 
term of two years, with a salary of $1,000 annually. New Hamp- 
shire was one of the thirteen original Stales. The capital is 
Concord. 

New Jersey (N. J.)— Named for the "Isle of Jersey." The sobriquet 
is "The Jersey Blue." The Governor is elected every three years, 
on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November, with an income 
of $5,000 annually. New Jersey was one of the thirteen original 
States. The capital is Trenton. 

New Mexico Ter. (N. M.)— Spanish; named from the country of 
Mexico, meaning "The Place of Aztec, God of War." The Gov- 
ernor is appointed b,\ the President. The term of office is four 
years and the salary 52,600 per annum. General elections occur on 
the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November. The capital 
is Santa Fe. 

New York (N. Y.)— Named in honor of the Duke of York and 
Albany. It is called "The Excelsior State" and "The Empire State." 
The Governor is elected for three years, with an annual salary of 
$10,000 and residence. The State election day is the Tuesday after 
the first Monday in November. New York was one of the thirteen 
original States. The capital is Albany. 

North Carolina (N. C.l— Named, with South Carolina, in honor of 
Charles It of England. The fictitious names are "The Old North 
Siate," "The Tar State" und "The Turpentine State." The Gov- 
ernor is elected on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November, 
The term of office is four years; the annual salary £3 030 and a 
furnished residence. North Carolina was one of the thirteen 
original States. The capital is Raleigh. 

North Dakota — Dakota is an Indian word, meaning "allied." 
North Dakota was admitted into the Union in lSsl). The Governor 
is elected for a term of four years, on the Tuesday after the first 
Monday in November. The capital is Bismarck. 




LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S 
UNDERWEAR 

In this particular an I important Department we have 
nefil of having onrovtfii tuners :it the 
iving our stock direct 
from tlie mills, we are always en II at. piicps 

bih-Ii as would I lo with others, and (or the 

s "Iter values that are unapproachabl 
ashmerc Vests, silk finished, iW to 40 i».,50c. 
Merino Vests, silk finished, 50c. 
lies' Extra Heavy Merino, fashioned Knit Shirt, 
high neck, lot OS, 5 1 .00. 

Ladies' French Balbriggan Vests, all styles, fOo each. 
Rib Cotton Vests, in Pink, Sky, Cream, 
Ecru and White, 25, 85 and 50c. 

Ladies' Swi-s Ribbed Lisle Thread Vesta, colors, 
cream, piuk, sky-blue and white, 50c, 75c and $1.00. ' 
Ladies' s'viss Ribbed Silk Vests, all colors, $1.00, 1.50, 
2.COand 2.80. 

Ladies' Silk and Wool Vests, heavy Swiss ribbed, in 
pink, white, sky and flesh, $2.50, 4.00 and 4.25. 

Ladies' Swiss Ribbed Saxony Wool Vests, all colors. 
long sleeves, -1 in, 1.50, 1.75 and 2.25. 

Ladies' Fancy Stripe Silk and Lisle Vests, $1.00, 1.50. 
Ladies' Fine. Pure Silk English Vests and Drawers, 
SG.OO to *8.0j each. 

Ladies' Medicated Scarlet Lambs' Wool Shirts and 
Drawers, $1.00, 1.25, 1.50, 2.00. 2.75 each. 

1 alifornia Lambs' Wool Shirts and Drawers, 
scailet and white, all sizes, $1.50 each. 
Children's Heavy Merino Vests and Pants, 35c and 50c. 
Children's White and Colored Saxony Vests, 50c, 75c 
and $!.<>>. 

Children's Fine English Vest', full finish, sizes 18 to 
30, reduced to 50c; 32 and 31, UOc; Drawers and Pantalets 
to match, same price, former price, $1.00. 
Children's Ribbed Saxony Wool Vests, 50c to $1.00. 
Infants' Fine Gossamer and Merino Vests. 
Infants' 811k Vests. 



& 4 

8» J93T"Possessing exclusive privileges of perfect light and ventilation, «j 

& our patrons can thoroughly examine our stock, with the greatest .5 

V* personal comfort. ■§ 

& ,8»*Orders by Mail or Telephone promptly filled, and forwarded ^ 

"~ by return Mail or Messenger. Sj 

__ Av"Samples sent free on receipt of request, to any address ■§ 

§» JWOur Mail Order Department is perfect, and saves patrons their ^ 

S» railroad fares. *i 

£ .05$~Purchasefl delivered free of carriage charges in Oakland, Ala- ^ 

t* meda, and Berkeley. *j 

& flffi-When you come to town, call on us. No trouble toshow ^ 

S* goods, and no importuning to purchase permitted. «J 



, i*- vt v viv viv -ii\' vt\- vi v -/i\- vi V -/iv '/iv -rfitr -*r.- vtv viv ViV vj v ViV ViV 
^ 'i. ^lijAl^tJ, .JB. v\'5^!{. d|£ .SB. .»«. .tfj. 4M. <t t.«M 4. •*!«. .M*. .}«. .SK. iju. 

IS INTERESTING FA0T§ i! 



?(«• -?i?^i?^ •Jill's* ^i?^i«> •?i?^i?^^i^^ *a?^s» -?i?^i? 






NAMES OF STATES, ETC.- Continued 

Ohio — An Indian word, signifying "Beautiful." It is nicknamed 
"The Buckeye State." Ohio was admitted into the Union in 1802. 
The State election day is the second Tuesday in October. The Gov- 
ernor's term of office is two years aud his annual salary $4,000. 
The capital is Columbus. 

Oregon ((.ire.)— signifies "River of the West." Oregon was admit- 
ted as a state in 1S59. The general election day is the first Monday 
in June. The Governor's term of office is four years and his salary. 
$1,500 annually. The capital is Salem. 

Painsiilvaina (Pa.)— "Peon's Woodland" is the signification. The 
sobriquet is "The Keystone State." The Governor is elected for a 
term of four years, at a salary of $10,000 per annum. The general 
election day is the Tuesday after the first Monday in November. 
Pennsylvania was one of the thirteen original States. The capital 
is lliurisburg. 

Rhode Islaud (R. I.)— Named from the Island of Rhodes in the 
Mediterranean. Rhodes signifies a "Rose." It is nicknamed 
"Little Rhody." The Governor is elected on the first Wednesday 
in April. His term of office is one year and annual salary $1,000. 
Rhode Islaud was one of the thirteen original States. It has two 
capitals, Providence and Newport. 

South Carolina {S. C.)— Named in the same manner as North Caro- 
lina. The soubriquet is "The Palmetto State."' The Governor is 
elected for two years, on the Tuesday after the first Monday in 
November, and has a salary of f8,S00 per year. South Carolina was 
one of the thirteen original States. The capital is Columbia. 

South Dakota— Named in tiie same manner as North Dakota, com- 
bined with which it formed the Territory of Dakota until 1889, 
when they were separated and admitted into the Uniou as States. 
The Governor is elected for a term of four years, on the Tuesday 
after the first Monday in November. The capital is Pierre. 

Tennessee (Tenn.)— Derived from Indian words, meaning "River 
of the Big Bend." It is nicknamed "The Big Bend State." Ten- 
nessee was admitted into the Union in 171)6, The Governor is 
fleeted every two years, with an annual salary of $4,000. The 
general election day is the Tuesday after the first Monday in 
November. The capital is Nastnille. 

Texas (Tex.) — Spanish ; said to signify "Friends." It is nicknamed 
"The Lone Star State." The State election is on the Tuesday after 
the first Monday in November. The Governor's term of office is 
two years, at an annual salary of $4,000. Texas was admitted into 
the Union in 1845. The capital is Austin. 

Utah Ter. (Utah) — Named from the Utes or Utah Indians. The 
Governor is appointed for a term of four years and has a salary of 
$2,600 per annum. The Territorial electiou day is the first Monday 
in August. The capital is Salt Lake City. 

Vermont (Vt.)— From the French, signifying "Green Mountain." 
It is called the "Green Mountain State." Vennout wns admitted 
into the Union in 1791. The Governor of the State is elected for 
two years, at an annual salary of $1,000. The State election occurs 
on the first Tuesday in September. The capital is Montpelier. 




J. J. O'BBIEN & CO. 



MUSLIN UNDERWEAR DEPT. 

in ■ Mini 

a price than (he 
mers. 

einbroid- 
ruffle, princess back, 

heavy mill icked 

. trimmed with a 
broidery and a clustered nine half-inch 
ruffle, handsomely made, $1.15. 

neck and sleeve bands 
■auis lull finished, 40c. 

ivy muslin, pointed yoke of (neks. 
and Hamburg insertion, neck and sleeves trimmed with 
embroidery, all scams linishe': 

re. made with deep hem 
and 'cluster of tacks, voke bands and full-finished seams, 

fine muslin, prettily made, with 
cluster tucks an. I full ruflle of tine embroidery, yoke 
bands, finished seams, 50c. 

Ladies' Large White Aprons, from 25c. to $3.00. 



A Full Line of EXTRA LARGE SIZES in Ladies' Gowns, 
Chemises and Drawers 

L'i> sa Cardigan Jackets, in plain colors- 

brown, navy and black, 75c. to $1.50; in fancy stripes, 
$1.00to*1.50. 

ran Jackets, with sleeves in solid colors, 
|2.50 to *3.00. 

Ladies' Woolen Leggins, in navy, black, garnet and 
brown, 50c and 75c. 



■IfflilBllllllllli 

■fli(T"lte sure to sign your name to letters. We often receive 
= motley withouta name signed to the letter containing it, forcing us 
= to delay till we have heard from the Postofficc where it was mailed, 

g ' i ' le goods you order are sold out, state, plainly il you 

: e us to send you the nearest thing to it we have. 

4£S"If you order a cloak or wrap, ready made or to be made, 
H consult our Rules tor Self-Measurement. 

Samples are sent to all points by mail. 

<*■ i" examine express packages can only he granted 

H after having forwarded to us full express rate both ways. 



HHIIIIIMIillil Illlinil! lll»lllllllllllll!il!l|llll!llll!lllll!lllll»ll!!lll!n!!li:illH:ilU|i||||||ll||!| 



IkS&F 



I N.TERES.TI NG! F A C T t 



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NAME OF STATES, ETC.— Continued 

Virginia (Va. )— Named for Elizabeth, Queen of England, the 
"Virgin Queen." It is nicknamed "The Mother of States," also 
"The Old Dominion." It was one of the thirteen original Stales. 
The Governor is elected for four years, on the Tuesday after the 
first Monday in November. He has a salary of .'5,000 per aunum. 
The capital is Richmond. 

Washington (Wash.)— Named for President Washington. The 
Governor is elected for a term of four years, ou the Tuesday after 
the first Monday in November. Washington was admitted into 
the Union in W89. The capital is Olympia. 

West Virginia (W. Va.)— Sec Virginia. It is nicknamed "The 
Panhandle State." West Virginia was admitted into the Union in 
1863. The Governor is elected ou the second Tuesday in October, 
for a term of four years. He has a salary of .12,700 yearly. The 
c ipital is Charlestown. 

Wisconsin (Wis.) — Named from its principal river, nnd that from 
the French, meaning "FlowingWestward." The fictitious name is 
"The Badger State." It was admitted into the Union in 1848. The 
Governor is elected Tor two years, with a salary of $5,000 per aunum. 
The state clectiou day is the Tuesday after the first Monday in 
November. The capital is Madison. 

Wyoming Ter. (Wyo.)— An Indian term, meaning "Large Plains." 
The Territorial election day is the Tuesday after the first Mgnday 
in November. The Governor is appointed for four years, at a salary 
of $2,600 annually. The capital is Cheyenne. 




UNITED STATES FLAG 

In June, 177fi. a committee was appointed by the Continental 
Congress to design a Aug for the new government about to go into 
operation. Colonel George Eoss was on this committee, who, 
acconif anied by George Washington, called upon an upholsterer 
residing at No. £39 Arch street. Philadelphia, named Mrs. Robs, to 
instruct her how to make the new flag. Washington himself made 
n drawing of the flag in her parlor, and while do'ng this took 
some suggestions from her as to its design. She said lhat the stars 
should be five-cornered instead of six- cornered, as Washington 
had made them. This and other changes were accepted by Wash- 
ington. This ingenious lady made the first flag, and several others 
afterward, finishing them up In n very superior maimer, entirely 
satisfaetory to those who had the honor of first lifting them to the 
breeze. 







J. J. O'BRIEN & CO. *■ 



INFANTS' AND CHILDREN'S 

UNDERWEAR DEPT. 

Wt the above in tho 

City an. I wi is at the lowest 

Bt artistic styles. 

The Cheapest Infant's Outfit in the Country. 

:; Knitted \\ ool Vests. 

2 Pinning Blankets or Barrow Coo 

;'. Night Hips, cambric, neck and sleeves trimmed. 

P. iy Dress, yoke tucked, neck and sleeves finished with 
embroidery, skirt trimmed with cluster of fine tucks and 
embroidered ruffle. 

1 Day Kress, entire front of tucks and Hamburg inser- 
tion, deep rufHe of embroidery on skirt, neek and sleeves 
handsomely finished. 

1 Day Skirt, fine material, deep hem and tucks. 

1 Day Skirt, with ruffle of fine embroidery and cluster 
tucks. 

1 Flannel Skirt, silk stitched. 

1 Flannel Shawl, silk embroidered. 

L' Flannel Bands, stitched with silk. 

C Bibs. 

3 Fair Wool Booties. 

1 Silk Embroidered Cap, full lace ruche. 

1 All Wool Cashmere Cloak, interlined with canton 
flannel, deep silk embroidered collar, handsomely fin- 
ished, colors, white or tan. Price of complete outfit, $14.75. 

At Half-price, Plush and Silk Caps, preparatory to 
Spring styles. We have an endle6s variety of Children's 
Plush and Silk Caps in the newest shapes, comprising all 
the handsome shades that are entirely new this season. 
Our While Silk Embroidered Caps for children and infants 
are becoming anil handsome. Frices in white from 75c. 
to $2.75 ; colored from 75c. to $4.50. 

Children's Drawers, heavy muslin, trimmed with 
cluster tucks and embroidery, finished seams, all sizes 
from 10 inches to 24 inches, 2oe. 

A full assortment of Children's Wool Drawerp and 
Knee Leggius, Wool Hoods, etc. 



li-'iisrlfclt? W -Jis- •»!*• ->ii- W -Jis- 5|S -W •?!*• *W ■»«■ •?!«• W 10- -Jiv- •»!*• i 

Vi. i5 

& £~*Posscssing exclusive privileges of perfect light and ventilation, ^ 
fc our patrons cat: thoroughly examine our stock, with the greatest ^ 
p personal comfort. «? 

W- .Kir-Orders hy Mail or Telephone promptly filled, and lorwardca •£ 

iby return Mail or Messenger. *tf 

.0"Saniplessent free on receipt of request, to any address A 1 

1 
*#*Our Mail Order Department is perfect, and saves patrons their ■$' 
railroad feres. •? 

.(^-Purchases delivered free of carriage charges iu Oakland, Ala- •> 
meda, and Berkeley. ^ 

45*Wheu you cruue to town, call on us. No trouble toshow < 
goods, and no importuning to purchase permitted. •& 



HtlSpERESTrNGj FAGT1 : H : 




FOINTS ABOUT THE FINGER. NAILS 

A white mark on the nail bespeaks. misfortune. SS^SQ 

Paie or lead-colored nails indicate melancholy; people. - '_'? t 
Broad mi ilsg indicate a gentle, limid and bashful nature.! 
Loveis of knowledge and liberal sentiment have round nails. ■%•• - 
People with narrow nails are ambitious and quarrelsome. * " 
Small nails indicate littleness of mind, obstinacy and conceit. 
OholericTmartial "men, delighting in war, have red and spotted 

jiailsT^jS^' _ _ 

Nails growing into the flesh at the points or sides indicate luxuri- 
ous ta&tes. 

Pe o ple with ver y paleuails are subject to much infirmilyfof the 
flesh and persecution by neighbors and friends. ~* &i_ 

AGES ATTAINED BY BIRDS 



Yean 

Blackbird 12 

Canary 24 

Crane". 24 

Crow 100 

Eagle 100 

Fowl, common 10 

Goldfinch : 15 

Goose 50 

Heron 60 

Lark 18 

Linnet 23 

Nightingale IS 

Parrot f30 



Years 

Partridge 15 

Peacock 24 

Pelican 50 

Pheasant 15 

Pigeon 20 

Raven 100 

Robin 12 

Skylark 30 

Sparrowhawk 40 

Swan 100 

Thrush 10 

Wren 3 



AGES ATTAINED BY ANIMALS 



Years] 

Elephant 400 | 

Whnle SOO | 

Tortoise 100 

Camel 40 

HorBe 25 

Bear 20 

Lion 20 



Ox 

Cat 

Dog.... 
Sheep. 
Squirrel.. 



Guinea Pig 7* 



DIMENSIONS OF THE CONTINENTS 

'Europe comprises an area of 3,756,070 square miles, has 19,500 
miles of seacoast — that is, ope mile of coast to every 192 square 
miles of surface — and its average height above sea level is !)85 feet. 

Asia comprises an area of 17,212,680 square miles, and has 35,000 
miles of seacoast— that is, one mile of coast to every 419 square 
miles of surface — and its average height above sea level is 1,600 feet. 

Africa comprises an area of 11,514,770 square miles, has 16,000 
miles of seacoast — that is, one mile of coast to every 719 square 
mites of surface -and its average height above sea level is 1,600 
feet. 





. . ic *>!*• *>»$* ■Viv' '/iC- *>ic *>, 'i't^''.* •> 



CORSET DEPARTMENT 

,!1 onr own I are in a position 

And the latent Etylea. 

: higli bust, 
I 00. 

en, firmly boned, 
mritebb tout figure, 

Abdominal, gray, $1.50. 
Thou - i .75. 

■ 00. 
K. long, M i ~ 1.75. 

. ( ille, $3.00. 
v. 12.25; black, $2 60. 
Hon w coutille, gray, $1.50. 

Thomson's N, nursing, $1.00. 
Thomson's 6, nursing, gray, $1.50. 
Thomson's Younf 76e. 

Thomson's Misses' Crown Brand, gray, 50c. 
Dr. Warner's French Model, ;i beautiful -shaped corset, 
fitting the form perfectly, gray, $1.00 and $1.50. 
Dr. Warner's Coraline, gray, $1.00. 
Dr. Warner's Health, gray, $1.25. 

Warner/v Abdominal, gray, $1.75- 
1'. 1'. a Long-waisted genuine French corset, at -SI. 75 to 
$5.00 and C. V. from $1.76 to $3.00. 
Try onr Special Cm-sets at 45c anil 50c. 

Eiffel — A new French Hand-made Corset, in fine Mack 
sateen, heavily and closely boned, extra long waisted, fitting 
the form perfectly, handsomely finished in colored silk 
emhroidery and fancy stitching. S3. 50. 

NOTE. — We guarantee this Corset to give perfect satis- 
faction. 

P. X., Coutille Corset, loug-waisted, double busk and side 

gray, $1.00. 
Dr. Strong's Tricora Relief Corsets, elastic sides, double 
busk and side steels, stayed with tampico, all sizes. 18 to 30 
inches, gray, SI. 00. 

Dr. Strong's Tricora Nursing, gray, $1.00. 
A full line of good sense Ferris Waists, in white and gray. 
Ladies' Waists. $1.25 and SI. 75; Young Ladies' Waists, $1.00; 
Misses' Waists, 85c ; Baby Waists, 50c and 75c. 

Large bustles being no longer fashionable, we have imported 
extensive lines of all the latest makes, comprising the Braided 
Wire Bustle, Dress Cushions, The Improved Pullman and Fen-is. 
These Bustles are especially adapted to the Empire and 
Directoire Skirts. 

NOTE. — Don't forget to send waist measure for corsets. 



CJZ /IS f /* f ?v~^ > 



DS-Be sure to sign your name to letters. We often receive 
money without a name signed to the letter containing it, forciug us 
to delay till we have heard from the Postoffice where it was mailed. 

A!S"In case the goods you order are sold out, state plainly if you 
desire us to send you the nearest thing to it we have. 

SS'Ii you order a cloak or wrap, ready made or to be made, 
consult our Rules for Self-Measurement. 

-*3F*Samples are sent to all points by mail. 

4S" Permission to examine express packages can only be granted 
after having forwarded to us full express rate both ways. 



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DIMENSIONS OF CONTINENTS— Continued 

North America comprises au area of 7,900,350 square miles, has 
24,500 miles of coast — that is, one mile of coast to every 322 square 
miles of surface — and its average height above sea level is 1,350 feet. 

South America comprises an area of 6,851,100 square miles, has 
14,500 miles of seacoast~that is, one mile of coast to every 472 
miles of surface — and its average height above sea level is 1,200 feet. 

Ausliatia comprises an area of 2,964,000 square miles, has 10,000 
miles of seaconst — that is, one mile of coast to every 296 miles of 
surJace— and its average height above the sea level is 822 feet. 



DIMENSIONS OF THE OCEANS 

The Atlantic Ocean covers an area of 35,100,030 square miles, and 
receives the waters drained from 19,050,000 square miles of laud, 
making the tolal area of its basin 54,210,000 square miles. Its aver- 
age depth is 12,050 feet. 

The Pacific Ocean covers an area of 07,800,000 square miles, and 
receives the waters drained from 8,660,000 square miles of laud sur- 
face, making the total area of its basin 70,460,000]square miles.Xlts 

average depth is 12.780 feet. 

The Indian Ocean covers an ar;a of 25,000,000 square miles, and 
receives the water drained from 5,590,000 square miles of land sur- 
face^ making the total area of its basin 30,590,000 square miles. Its 
average depth is 10,980 feet. 

The Arctic Ocean covers an area of 5,000,000 square miles, and 
receives the waters drained from 7,415,000 square miles of land sur- 
face, making the total area of its basin 12,415,000 square miles. Its 
average depth is 5,100 feet. 

The Antarctic Ocean, having been as yet only partially explored, 
neither its surface area nor the area of the land draining into it is 
known. The total area of its basin is 8,175,000 square miles, and its 
average depth is given as 6,000 feet. 



DISTRIBUTION OF LAND AND WATER 

000,000 
being 



The land on the surface of the globe occupies au area of 
square miles, and the water covers 145,500,000 square miles, 
2 4-5 times as much as" the land. 

In the land hemisphere the land occupies an area of 44 
square miles, and the water covers 54,000,000 square miles 
one-fifth more than the land. 

fn the water hemisphere the land occupies an area of S, 
square miles, and the water covers 90,000.000 square miles. 
11 3-10 times as much as the land. 



.000,000 
being 



,000,000 
, being 



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4- + + + + + + + + + + + + + 'H' + + + + + + + + "J' + + +U 











CENTS' FURNISHING DEPT. 

Forth* next thirty day* ice trill offer the following bargains: 

30J desen Gents' himv silk and Satin Scarfs, newest 

~. light and dark colon, regular values 60c, reduced 

. Fine silk Scarfs, in the latest styles of four- 
in-hand, teck. etc., all new fancy colorings, regular price 
uli. 
'MO dozen Large Size Hemstitched Handkerchiefs, 

fancy - newest patterns, regular price 

-'«'. reduced to l-'.-i- each. 

2ti i dozen < ients' Extra Large Size Fancy Bordered and 
White Silk Handkerchiefs, regular price $1.10, reduced 
each. 

dozen Gents' Real Kid and Dogskin Walking and 
Driving Gloves, with plain or stitched backs, assorted 
Bhades. regular prieo $1.50 and $2.00, reduced to $1.00 
and $1.60 a pair. 

70J dozen Gents' Four Ply Linen Collars, newest 
shapes, regular value 20c, reduced to 10c. 

200 dozen Gents' While Unlaundered Shirts, double 
back and reinforced linen fronts, regular price 85c, re- 
duced to 50c caeh. 

100 dozen Seamless Cotton Socks with double heels 
and toes, regular value 20c, reduced to 12,'.jc a pair. 

150 dozen Gents' Lambs' Wool Socks in Shetland, 
Scarlet, Navy blue and Brown, seamless, with double 
heels and toes, regularly sold at $4.20 a dozen, reduced 
to 25c a pair. 

100 dozen Gents' Superfine Lambs' Wool Socks, seam- 
less, with double heels and toss, colors navy brown, 
scarlet mode shades: also camel's hair, regular price $0.00 
a dozen, reduced to 33Ku a pair 

200 dozen Gents' White and Colored English Merino 
Shirts and Drawers, all sizes, worth 75c, reduced to 50c 
each. 

100 dozen Gents' Shetland Merino Undershirts and 
Drawers, silk finished, regular value $1.00, reduced to 
75c each. 

75 doz.en Gents' Shetland Natural Wool Shirts and 
Drawers, special value, worth regular $1.50, reduced to 
$1.0 J each. 

A Cdmplete Assortment of Gents' Overshirts in Striped 
and Plain English and French Flannels, Silk and Wool 
Stripes, Flannelettes, Tricots, Serges, etc., etc., with 
plain, embroidered or- pleated fronts at 75c, $1.00, $1.51) 
to $3.50 each. 



'i. -S 

v* .G3*Possessing exclusive privileges of perfect light and ventilation, «J 

U our patrons can thoroughly examine our stock, with the greatest ^ 

? personal comfort. «S 

^ .*&~Orders by Mail or Telephone promptly filled, end forwarded ^ 

^ by return Mail or Messenger. Sj 



^tS^Samplessent free ou receipt of request, to any address 



.KS-Our Mail Order Department i^ perfect, and saves patrons their 
railroad fares. 

flSy-Purchases delivered free of carriage charges in Oakland, Ala- «S 

meda, and Berkeley. "Sj 

When you come to town, call on us. No trouble toshow «S 

goods, and no importuning to purchase permitted. S§ 



^it> <7i>«3iSwjft»W 



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INiTE R EST IXG F ACT S 






■ 



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/- At/* j?/. Mr*. Mr* Mr* Mr* Mr* Mr* Mr* Mr* Mr* Mr* Mr* Mr* Mr* Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. -\ ' 



THE DEB1VATI0NS OF THE NAMES OF 
THE MONTHS 

January — The Roman Janus presided over the beginning of every- 
thing'; hence the first month of the 3'ear was called after him. 

February— The Roman festival Febres was held on the fifteenth 
day of this month in honor of Lupercus, the god of fertility. 

March — Named from the Roman god of war, Mais. 

April — Latin, Aprilis; probably derived from aperire, to open, 
because spring generally begins and the buds open in this month. 

Sfay — Latin, Mains; probably derived from Maia, a feminine 
divinity worshiped at Rome ou the first day of this month. 
June. — Juno, a Roman divinity worshiped as the Queen ofHeaveu. 
July (Julius) — Julius Caesar was born in this mouth. 

August — Named by the Emperor Augustus Csesar (B. c. 30) after 
himself, as he regarded it a fortunate month, being that in which 
he gaiued several victories. . 

September (septum, or 7) — September was the seventh mouth in 
the old Roman calendar. 

October (octo) — Eighth month of the old Roman year. 

November (novem, or 9) — November was the ninth month in the 
old Roman year. 

December (decern, or 10) — December was the tenth month of the 
early Roman year. About the 21st of this mouth the sun enters the 
Tropic of Capricoru and forms the winter solstice. 




DAYS OF THE WEEK 



Sunday— Sax. Sunnandaeg, day of' the sun. 

Monday— Get. Montag, day ofthe moon. 

Tuesday — Ang.-Sax. Tiwesdaeg, from Tiw, the god of war. 

Wednesday— Ang.-Sax. Wodnesdaeg, from Odin, thegod of storms. 

Thursday — Dan. Thor, the god of thunder. 

Friday — Sax, Frigedaeg, day of Freya, goddess of marriage. 

Saturday — Day of Saturn, the god of time. 

The names of the seven days of the week originated with the 
Egyptian astronomers. They gave them the names ofthe sun, 
moon and five planets, viz.. Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus and 
Saturn. 

The Chinese and Thibetans have a week of five days, named alter 
iron, wood, water, feathers and earth. 




gf pr-'f 1 4- Murphy Building 4- 4- -I- 4- 4- 4- Market & Jones Sts . 4 1 4* 4- 1 




J.J.O'BEIEMCO> 



CLOVE DEPARTMENT 

nt ol (Moves t.. be Found 
■ 1 notabl) the "Alexandre," the pa 
to try these goods and pi 

indre" KW Gloves, in 4 aud <'» button 

:n backs, S| .73 in i iir . 

uidre" Kiri Gloves, in 4 and t'. button 
lengths, embroidered backs, 92.00 and $2.25 per pair. 
in all colors and aha 
Our ■ ■ ( t-loves, in 4 and 6 buttoi ■ plain 

and $1.50 per pair. 
On i ■■>. in ."» and ti button lengths, em- 

broidered backs, $1-50 and $1.75. 

Our Arcade Kid Gloves, in 8 button lengths, Mousquetaire 
Btyle, plain backs, $1.75 a pair. 



SPECIAL REDUCTIONS 

~'t dozen Ladies 4-Buttou Kid Gloves, new stitching, in 
dark and medium colors and black. Former price $1.50, 
reduced t«> $1.00 a pair. 

60 dozen Ladies 1 5-Button Kid Gloves, new stitching, in 

dark ami medium colors and black. Former price $2,00. 
reduced to $1.50 a pair. 

T.'i dozen Ladies' S-Button Length Mousquetaire Undressed 
Kid Gloves, new stitching, in medium and slate colors. 
Former price $1.75, reduced to $1.25 a pair. 

85 dozen Ladies' 4-Button Kid Gloves, new stitching, in 
dark and medium colors and black. Former price $1.25, 
reduced to Toe a pair. 

50 dozen Ladies' S -Button Length Mousquetaire Undressed 
Kid Gloves, new stitching, in tan colors. Former price 
$1.25, reduced to 75c a pair. 

50 dozen Ladies' Dogskin Gauntlets, in dark and medium 
colors and black. Reduced to $1.25 a pair. 

150 dozen Ladies' Taffeta Silk Jersey Gloves, in medium 
and tan colors and black. Former price .">0c, reduced to 25c. 



/ // /•/ / / / / j?/_ / y^/ / /_ / / / / '- /"/"y '■& '; 



49-Besun t* q your narne *to letters. We ofteD receive 

in< > without a name Signed to the letter containing it, forcing as 

to delay till we have heard from the Postoffice where it was mailed 

[n case the goods you order are sold out, state plainly if you 
■\- i us to send you the □ larest thing to it we have. 

43»If you order a cloak or wrap, ready made or to be made, 
consult our Rules for Self-Measurement , 

Xgr*Samples are Bent to &U points by mail, 

tfS'Penniesiini to examine express packages can only be granted 
after having forwarded to us full express rates both ways. 



;^.a^/./ /77 77-77X77 7 f~7~7 T^TJZZZXLa 



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, i» .y^l*. JM* -V^T,5. ^Tfc -It <- •*!£. ,XT£. <^?4. ^J& ^!&, ■■&?&■ .tf & ^T*. .&»£. ;Me. ,*!«. ,J!£ ^ 



^«">I 




PHILOSOPHICAL FACTS 
The greatest height at which visible clouds ever exist dees not 
exceed ten miles. 
Air is about 815 times lighter than water. 

The pressure of the atmosphere upou every square foot of the 
earth amounts to 2,160 pounds. 

An ordinary-sized man, supposing his surface to be fourteen 
square feet, sustains the enormous pressure of 110.240 pounds. 

The barometer falls one-tenth of an inch for every seventy-eight 
feet of elevation. 

The violence of the expansion of water when freezing is sufficient 
to cleave a globe of copper of such thickness as to require a force 
of 27,000 pounds to produce the same effect. 

During the conversion of ice into water 140 degrees of heat are 
absorbed. 

Water, when converted into steam, increases in bulk 1,800 times. 
In one second of time, in one beat of the pendulum cf a clock, 
light travels 200,(100 miles. 

Were a caunon ball shot toward the sun, and were it to maintain 
fullspeed.it would be twenty years in reaching it; and yet light 
travels through this space in seven or eight minules. 

Strange as it may appear, a ball of a ton weight and another of 
the same material of an ounce weight, falling from any height, will 
reach the ground at the same time. 

The heat does not increase as we rise above the earth nearer to 
the sun, but decreases rapidly until, beyond the regions of the 
atmosphere, in void, it is estimated that the cold is about seventy 
degrees below zero. The line of perpetual frost at the equator 
is 15,0.0 feet altitude, 13 000 feet between the tropics, and 9 000 to 
4,000 fee^betweeti the latitudes of forty degrees and forty-nine 
degrees. 

At a depth of forty-five feet under ground the temperature of the 
earth is uniform throughout the year. » 

In summer time the season of ripening moves northward at the 
rate of about ten miles a day. 

The human ear is so extremely sensitive that it can hear a sound 
that lasts only the twenty-four thousandth part of a second. Deaf 
persons have sometimes conversed together through rods of wood 
held between their teeili, or held to their threat or breast. 

The ordinary pressure of the atmosphere on the 'surface of the 
earth is 2,160 pounds to each square foot, or fifteen pounds to each 
square inch, equal to thirty perpendicular inches of mercury or 
thirty-four aud one-half feet of water. 

Sound travels at the rate of 1,142 feet per second, about thirteen 
miles in a minute; so that, if we hear a clap of thunder half a min- 
ute after the flash, we may calculate that the discharge of electricity 
is six aud one-half miles away. 
Lightning'can be seen by reflection at a distance of 200 miles. 
Theexplosive force of closely confined gunpowder is six andahali 
tons to the square inch. 




h4* -r- 4* Murphy Building 4- 4* 4* 4- 4- 4- Market & Jones £.t s. 4 1 4- 4-fc 



^s^s^s^^S^^*? 1 ^^^ 




Parasol and Umbrella Department 

W< lock of Parasols 

and Umbrellas, for ii is i lie largest and besl oroortmenton 
the Const. In parasols we show the many new and artistic 
- in materials, ami all the latent fashionable Bhapes. 
The following « ill convey an Idea of the completeness of 
tli i =« Block, which embra 



PARASOLS 

In Shaded Plaids, Stripes, Checks, Brocades. Moires, 
Twills, Satins, in Hlsck and Colored, and in Gold. J-ilver, 
Oxidized, Natural Ebony, Ivory and Celluloid Handles. 



PARASOLS 

In such shapes as Canopy, Czarina, La Tosca. Piccadilly, 
Fedora. Directoire, etc. 

Poncee Parasols, $1.03 to $5.00 each. 

Black Uce Parasols, *l.fi0, 2 00, 2.&0, :U0to 13.00 each. 

Coaching Parasols, .fl-CO, 1.25, 1. 50, 1.75, 2.00 to 2.50 
each, all colors. 

Directoire Parasols. $3 00, 3.50, 4.00 to 10.00 each. 

Fancy Parasols from $1.00, 1.25, 1.50 to 12.50 each. 

Carriage Parasols from $1.50 to $5.00 each. 

All Lace Parasols from $1.50 to $20.00 each. • 



UMBRELLAS 

Ladies' Alpaca Umbrellas in endless variety, various 
sizes with Oxidized Handles, $1.10, 1.25, 1.50, 2.00, 2.50 
and 3.00. 

Ladies' Twilled Silk Umbrellas with Oxidized and Plain 
Handles in all sizes, $3.00, 3.50, 4.00, 4.50 and 5.00. 

Ladies' Twilled Silk Umbrellas in all sizes with Gold, 
Sterling Silver and Deerhorn Handles, $5.00, 0X0, 7.50, 
9.00 and 10.00. 

Gentlemen's Umbrellas in Alpaca and Twilled Silk 
with New and Stvlish Handles, $ .50, 1.00, 1.50, 2.00, 3,00 
4.00, 5.00. 7.50, 10.00 and 12.50. 



& S 

|» 03~Possessing exclusive privileges of perfect light and ventilation, «} 

fo our patrons can thoroughly examine our stock, with the greatest .g 

K» personal comfort. ^ 

U .03-Orders by Mail or Telephone promptly filled, and forwarded j§ 

S? by return Mail or Messenger. «5 

& Ay-Samples sent free on receipt of request, to any address < 

'& 3KS~OurMail Order Department is perfect, andsaves patrons their «8 

S? railroad fares. ^ 

'& .eg-Purchases delivered free of carriage charges in Oakland, Ala- «g 

,V? meda, and Berkeley. <3 

& 45-When you come to town, call on us. No trouble to show «g 

|\* goods, and no importuning to purchase permitted. 1 



. i?WWWW W^ft" W "»«■ •>!«• •»(? "»«■ •»!«• ■»«■ -JlS- -ftf -7|i? •?!<■ 
«. .JK. .}<£ .Jti. -M«- vMJj^li, -SK- -JK. .J«. .Jl*. .XK. ^I{. .J!4. ■*!«. .»<. ^1/. ^ 



Alp*!: . 









HINTS FOR HOUSEKEEPERS 

Ants, Red— Sprigs of winter- green or ground ivy will drive away 
red ants. Branches of wormwood will serve the same purpose for 
black ants. The insects maybe kept out of sugar barrels by draw- 
ing a wide chalk mark around the top, near the edge. A little 
quicklime placed in the infested places will drive away any kind ol 
ants. Insect powder, which can be bought at any drug store, 
sprinkled around the infested places, will keep afray all kinds of 
insects. 

Boots—To make the leather waterproof, saturate them with 
castor oil; to stop squeaking, drive a peg in the middle of the sole. 

Calicoes — To wash colored calicoes dissolve, say, 10 cents' worth of 
sugar of lead in six to eight quarts of pure water (rain water is 
best), and, after the garments are washed and rinsed, let them be 
dipped in and wrung out. It not only sets the color, but keeps it. 

Cement for Class — A good, clear cement for glass is hard to find. 
One is made by dissolving an ounce of isinglass in two wineglasses 
of spirits of wine. Care must be taken not to let it boil over, as it 
is highly inflammable. 

Chimney on Fire — Throw into the stove, or upon the coals in the 
fireplace, a handful of salt or sulphur; close the stove-draught, or 
hold a board or blanket before the fireplace. 

Clinkers — To remove clinkers from stoves or fire-brick, put in 
about half a peck of oyster shells on top of a bright fire. This may 
need repeating. 

Cloth — To remove tar from, rub it well with turpentine, and every 
trace of tar will be removed. 

Colors — To set the color in blue lawn, dissolve a half-pound oi 
saltpetre in a pailful of water, and dip the lawn in it several times 
before washing. 

Cuts— A. drop or two of diluted creosote on a cut will stop its 
bleeding*. 

Dolls — To keep from breaking, it has been proved by experience 
with several dolls that filling the entire head with wet plaster of 
Paris, and allowing it to set firmly, will render the head almost 
indestructible. 

Egg Stains — To remove from spoons, rub with common salt. 

Flannels, Washing — The proper way to wash woolen garments or 
socks is to rub them gently through warm suds made of white, 
hard soap, with a teaspoouful of powdered borax to each two gal- 
lons. Rinse in clear, warm water, and dry quickly, 

Fruit Stains — To remove the stains of fruit from the hands, wash 
your hands in clear water, dry slightly, and while yet moist strike a 
sulphur match and hold your hands around the flames. The stains 
will instantly disappear. 

Furniture, to Clean — First rub with cotton waste dipped in boiled 
linseed oil; then rub clean and dry with soft flannel cloth. Care 
should be taken that the oil is all removed. 

Gill ArliWes, Test For — To ascertain whether an article is gilt or 
made of gold-colored alloy, Weber uses a solution of bichloride of 
copper, which gives a brown spot on an alloy, bu t produces no effect 
on a surface of gold. 







J. J. O'BBIEN & CO. 



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DRESS TRIMMINGS 

< 'ur stx-k ol dress trimmings includes an endless vari- 

i the newest exquisite designs, ranging in material 

from the most costly articles known to handsome and 

able goods at moderate - 

The following will convey an idea of the exceedingly 
low prices at which these beautiful goodB are offered. 

Black Bead Band Trimming, from 26c to $8.60. 

Black Bead Trimming, separable patterns, from 75c to 
$10.00 a yard. 

Black Bead Drop Ornaments, from 15c to $7.50 each. 

Black Braid and Satin Cord Trimming, in bands and 
separable patterns, from 25c to $7.50 a yard. 

Colored Braid and Satin Cord Trimming, in bands and 
trimming, from 50c to $8.50 a yard. 

Iridescent Bead Trimming, in bands, separable patterns 
and drop ornaments, from $1.00 to $20.00 a yard. 

Black and Colored Bead sets, from $1.50 to $22, SO each. 

Milanaise and Tinsel Trimming, in bands, separable 
patterns and ornaments, from 50c to $8.00 a yard. 

Chenille Silk and Tape Fringes, from 50c to $10.00 
yard. 

.Marabout Trimming, in black and colored, from 65c to 
$2.50 a yard. 

Black Silk Knotted Fringe, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50 
to $3.00 a yard. 




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4S"Be sure to sign your name to letters. We often receive 
money without a name signed to the letter containing it, forcing us 
to delay till we have heard from the Postoffice where it was mailed. 

tfjy-Tn case the goods you order are sold out, state plainly if you 
desire us to send you the nearest thing to it we have. 

,K3*If you order a cloak or wrap, ready made or to be made, 
consult our Rules for Self-Measurement. 

j83*Samples are sent to all points by mail. 

X5~Permission to examine express packages can only be granted 
after having forwarded to us full express rate both ways. 



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RIBBON DEPARTMENT 
Satin and Gros Grain Ribbon, all Colors 

Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16, 22 
6J, 8-J, 10, 12^ 15, 20, 25, 30, 40c 



Moire Ribbon in all Colors 



2, 


5, 


7, 


9, 


12, 


16 


5, 


8i, 


10, 


124, 


15, 


20c 



Nos. 



Sash Ribbon 

In all the newest shades, with and without .Feather Edge, 
9, 10 and 11 inches wide. Price §1.00 to $1.50 a yard. 



Fancy Hat Ribbon in all Colors 

5c, 10c, 15c, 20c, 25c, 35c, 50c 

Gros Grain Ribbon, Satin Edge, in all 
Colors 

Nos. 2, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16, 30, 40 

6, 8J, 10, 12J, 15, 20, 30, 35c 




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RIBBON DEPT.-Continued 

Fur Trimmings 

We aro showing a large stock of fur trimmings, embracing 
every known fur in the market, which we offer at pric< 
below any ever quoted on 

Black Hare, lined and padded, 2 in. $ .50 per yard ' 
" " " " " 3 in. .75 

4 in. 1.00 " 

5 in. 1.25 " 
' Gin. 1.50 " 

Gray Hare, 3 in. S -75 per yard. 

" 4 in. 1.00 
Coney, uulined, 2 in. $0.25 per yard. 
3 in. .35 
" 4 in. .50 " 
Neuter, extra, 2 in. $1.00 per yard. 

3 in. 1.35 

4 in. 1.75 ** 
Coney, lined, 2 in. $0.30 per yard. 

" 3 in. .50 
*' 4 in. .65 " 
Gray Coney, lined, 2 in. § .05 per yard. 
3 in. .85 
" 4 in. 1.15 " 
Ex. Beaver, 2 in. §2.50 per yard. 

3 in. 3.75 " 

4 in. 5.00 
Chinchilla, 2 in. §2.00 per yard. 

" 3 in. 3.00 

4 in. 4.00 " 

Full assortment of Lynx, Opossum, Wild Cat, Monkey, 
Fox and Astrakhan Furs at very low prices. 



S, 

flS^Possessiug exclusive privileges of perfect light mid ventilation, «a 
our patrons can thoroughly examine our stock, with the greatest «$! 
personal comfort. Ta 

.{©■Orders by Mail or Telephone promptly filled, and forwarded «$ 
by return Mail or Messenger. "> 4 

-(©"Saraplesseut free on receipt cf request, to any address «4 

■O^Our Mail Order Department in perfect, and saves patrons their Jj 
railroad fares. 

35-Purchases delivered free of carriage charges iu Oakland, Ala- 
meda, and Berkeley. 

jOSp-When you come to town, call on us. No trouble to show 
goods, aud no importuning to purchase permitted. ^ 



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HINTS— Continued 



l'efz'ct—To raise the pile, cover a hot iron with a wet cloth and 
hold the velvet over it; brush it quickly while damp. 

Vinegar , Home-made — Put in au open cask four gallons of warm 
rainwater, one gallon of common molasses and two quarts of yeast; 
cover the top with thin muslin and leave it in the sun, covering it 
up at night and when it rains. lu three or four weeks it will be 
good vinegar. 

Washing Fluid — One can of the best concentrated lye; 5 cents' 
worth of salts of tartar; 10 cents' worth of ammonia dissolved ill one 
gallon of waters put in a pig »nd cork tightly; to use it, wash the 
clothes through one suds first; then put nearly a quarter of a lea- 
cupful of the mixture to a boilerful of clothes; boil thoroughly 
twenty minutes; then remove, and rinse the clothes in two waters. 

Water, Test for Lead — Add to the water a little sulphuret of 
ammonia or potash. If the lead be present it will be known by the 
color of the water, which will have a dark-brown or blackish tinge. 

Whit-trash, Durable — Fresh, well-slaked lime, stirred into equal 
parts of water and buttermilk to the usual consistency, will make a 
whitewash that will not rub off. Keep it hot while applying it. 



POPULATION OF THE GLOBE 
JBy Continents 

F.urnf>c, in an area of 3,75S..,70 square miles, supports a population 
of 331,^72,000, being 88.3 persons to the square mile. 

As a has an area of 17,212,680 square miles and 705,591,000 inhabi- 
tants, being 46.2 persons to the square mile. 

Africa has an area of 11,511,770 square miles and a population of 
205,825,000 souls, being 17.8 persons to the square mile. 

North America, iu an area of 7,900,350 square miles, supports 
72,500,000 inhabilants, or 9.1 persons to the square mile. 

South America, in an area of 6,851,000 square miles, supports a 
population of '28,400,000, or 4.1 per square mile. 

Oceanica, having an area of 3,456,700 square miles, supports a 
population of 4,310,000, or 1.2 persons to the square mile. 

The Polar Regions, in an area of 1,730,000 square miles, supports 
82,000 inhabitants, being .05 per square mile. 

By Races 

The Mongolian or Turanian Peoples, who occupy the greater part 
of Asia, are 630,000,000 in number. 

The />/ do- Germanic or Aryan Race, chie8y inhabiting Europe, 
Persia, etc., number 545,600,000. 

The Ne%ro and Batttu Tribes, inhabiting Central Africa, number 
150, 000,00 J. 

The Semiticor Hamilic Tribes, occupying North Africa and Arabia, 
number 65,000,000. 

The Malav and Polynesian Tribes, occupying Australasia and 
Polynesia, number 35.000,000. 

The American, Indians of North and South America number 
15,000,000. 

The Hotltnlots and Bnshmen of South Africa are 150,000 in number